[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

TO BIND OR NOT TO BIND



This has been "lifted"from exlibris. Anyone care to respond?

Peter

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

>From peelle@KENYON.EDU  Wed Nov  1 13:03:00 1995
Date:    Tue, 31 Oct 1995 16:17:26 EST
From:    Jami Peelle Kenyon College <peelle@KENYON.EDU>
Subject: TO BIND OR NOT TO BIND
Message-ID: <"uW7n23.0.A84.40tbm"@sul2>

Dear Friends and Colleagues:

I would like to impose on you for some advice.  I'm realatively new at this
and would hate to do something terribly stupid.

We have a two volume set of "The British Gallery of Portraits..."
London: Printed for T.Cadell, in the Strand, bookseller to the Royal Academy,
by J. M'Creery, Tooks Court. 1822
2v.  ports. 42.5x35cm.

The bindings, particularly the spines (one of the text blocks is split in
to three), have been badly damaged.  One of them
has a broken corner, and the red leather has been pocked, I am guessing from
the two volumes being stored together in at some point rather moist conditions
causing them to stick together.  The set is important to us because it includes
portraits of several of the original donors to our college.  In their current
condition, they can really not be displayed without causing further damage to
the text block.

A very talented, but to me, expensive bookbinder has given me estimates on
restoration or total rebinding that are well over $2,000 dollars.  The hinging
and hand sewing of the single sheet leaves appears to be the major cost.
Though I could look for a less expensive binder, I can't imagine that the cost
will go  down much.

Though there are only eleven holdings listed in the NUC, according to the 1994
American Bookprices, these volumes sold for only $190.
I was suprised that they went for such a low price.  My quandry is the
advisablility of spending so much to preserve volumes that are valued so low.

Do any of you that do not have in house conservators have some sort of
guideline on what treatments you are willing to pay for relative to the value
of the items being conserved.  It seems a shame to send them off to a
commercial library binder.  I supppose another poor choice might be to disbind
them and keep them in a print portfolio?  What would you do?

Desperate for advice,

Jami Peelle
Special Collections Librarian

Please respond to PEELLE@KENYON.EDU
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>|<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
Peter D. Verheyen                                       <wk> 315.443.9937
Conservation Librarian                                  <fax>315.443.9510
Syracuse University Library               <email>pdverhey@mailbox.syr.edu
Syracuse University                    <www>http://web.syr.edu/~pdverhey/
Syracuse, NY 13244                <Listowner>Book_Arts-L@listserv.syr.edu


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]