[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: req: Lynd Ward



On Fri, 14 Feb 1997, Denis Gouey wrote:

> Michael E. Morin wrote:
> >
> > On Thu, 13 Feb 1997, Michel Rogerson wrote:
> >
> > > with the risk of sounding dumb, what's a `woodcut book?'
> > > I am a printmaker, too, and I must have been sick that day...
> > >
> > >
> > > __________________________________________________________
> > > Michel Rogerson, life-long bibliophile...
> > > University of Nebraska, Book Repair Specialist,
> > > Love Library bindery, Lincoln NE 68588-0410
> > > work: (402) 472-2523
> > > michaelr@unllib.unl.edu
> >
> > Michael,
> >
> > Your question isn't dumb.  Your just another victum of a system of higher
> > education that's in love with itself, leaving no room for anything
> > useful, sincere or creative. My tenure in three highly questionable
> > art schools gave me quite another education.
> >
> > Thanks to my Bibliograhic Adoption Program (BAP) I have (somewhere) a
> > mouldly Lund Ward book that has no text.  The entire story is told with
> > wood engravings, not words.  As I recall, an ugly orange-brown ink.  The
> > mould dosen't seem so bad next to the ink!
> >
> > Stand tall! If Lynd Ward is all you missed, consider yourself lucky!  To
> > me his work is kind of blah.  Due respects to his fans.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > *****************************************************************
> >
> >      M I C H A E L   M O R I N                M.F.A., M.L.S.
> >
> > Director Celtic Press               Instructional Media Librarian
> >   Buffalo  New York                  D'Youville College Library
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------
> >                     ba202@freenet.buffalo.edu
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------
> >          Co-Moderator Buffalo Free-Net Preservation SIG
> >     Member Buffalo Free-Net Information Development Committee
> > *****************************************************************
>
>
>
> Now that's rather self-serving idiotic answer to a simple question, and
> does nothing to clarify the term "woodcut book". Are woodcut books the
> name for the books created by lynd Ward or by Frans Masereel, books with
> only woodcuts and no words telling a story or are they simply books
> containing woodcuts throughout the text?
>
> Curious and waiting for an intelligent answer.
> Denis
> --
>
>
> Denis Gouey
>
>
> Denis Gouey Bookbinding Studio
> PO Box 383 Norfolk CT, 06058
>
> 860 542 5063
>
> http://w3.nai.net/~bbliopeg
>

Perhaps is is more clear.

In general, our art schools teach nothing of artist like Lynd Ward.  Period.
In general, Artist's like Lynd Ward are thought of (if at all) as quaint,
uncool and not worth mentioning.

The amount of engraving taught in the printmaking programs wouldn't fill
a hat.  To learn such things, in general, one must find a practicioner or
a book.

It is disstressing to see how little printing is being done by student
printmakers, even in Graduate programs.  Editions of 2 or 3 prints, made
in an ungraduate class won't teach much about the process.  Printing
isn't cool either, or so it would seem.

There are of course exceptions, excellent programs with well rounded
teachers that are more concerned with teaching a broad range of
technique, history, tradition and style.

But there aren't enough of them.

My original comments were not directed at any individual but was meant to
explain why anyone could study printmaking in art school and not learn
about a wood engraver like Lynd Ward, or wood engraving at all.

Personally, while I like Rockwell Kent's work, I never thought much of
Lynd Ward's "engraved novels"  Maybe if I saw more of them in Art School,
I would be more interested in them.

But even if I don't like the work, Lynd Ward has a place in the tradition
and should be taught about when teaching engraving.  Just because he
dosen't personally inspire me or the hip crowd in New York dosen't mean
that type of work isn't of value.  Same goes for engraving in general.

I think my description was clearly about the Lynd Ward's books without
words.  Each page after the title page progresses the story with a new
full-page engraving.

The engraving illustrates nothing...it IS the story.  While not exactly a
flip book the engravings tell a visual story one page at a time.  It
serves more as a story board than an animation.

I don't know how else to describe it.  An again, I'm refering only to
Ward's book.  I don't no about anyone else's approach to such a work.


Perhaps others do not share my critism of what is being taught in art
schools and printmaking programs and that's fine.  I have taught in
several large state systems and found them very intollerant places.

As a person would has printed editions for other printmakers for twenty
years, I know what they weren't taught because it shows in their
processes and craftsmanship.

I hope that this is a more acceptable response.

The origanal question was rather open ended and so was my response.

regards,


*****************************************************************

     M I C H A E L   M O R I N                M.F.A., M.L.S.

Director Celtic Press               Instructional Media Librarian
  Buffalo  New York                  D'Youville College Library
-----------------------------------------------------------------
                    ba202@freenet.buffalo.edu
-----------------------------------------------------------------
         Co-Moderator Buffalo Free-Net Preservation SIG
    Member Buffalo Free-Net Information Development Committee
*****************************************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]