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Re: If it's good, it's art ...



At 07:03 PM 3/19/97 -0500, you wrote:
>Although I derive my income from the conservation and preservaiton of
books,>ie I guess I am a professional. To me though professionalism is a
state of>mind.

That is a generous way of putting it, but I find that if one is proficient
in a field, even "expert" and does not "practice" it as a principal career,
that those who do tend to discount their expertise and "professionality" <g>.

 The professional will go out of their way more to keep up with the>latest
standards, whatever they may be, and to further their education.

True, unless the skill is an historic or traditional one where remaining
true to "old" practices and methods are prized.

> They>have to, or at least should. I have also seen some amateurs who
>acted more>professional than some professionals. That goes for binders >as
well as>librarians, where the amateurs might be compared to
"para->professionals."

I have always been a "book lover" since before I learned to read.  In High
School for four years I was a library assistant, becoming the "head" of
that group and under the direction of the librarian did all the tasks of
general library work, acquisition, accession, and, since I was "into"
binding, repair and refurbishing.  I did this in college as well and was
usually kept busy with repairing bindings and lettering spines. <g>  So I
am familiar with "page casters", tissue repair, guarding pages and sections
and the like.
However, when the book was a valuable one and I felt that it should be
handled by a "professional", I never hesitated to insist that it be done
that way.  What I felt that I "could" do or more importantly what I
"should" do was the guide.

 I>also think it is a question of commitment. There is absolutely nothing
wrong>with being a hobbiest, if that makes one happy.

True, again !  And thought I thought myself "proficient" I never even
considered making conservation a  "profession" or "career".

>It's when I see hobbiest
>type work being passed off as professional that I worry, which takes us
back>to an earlier "discussion" in January.

I guess in some ways it becomes a matter of confidence and
"self-assessment".  First "should" one even attempt to do this particular
task,  secondly, "can" one do it without doing further or irreparible
"harm" to a possibly significant book and third and not least, are the
proper materials and equipment available to do the job properly.

'Tis a puzzlement ! <g>


David


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