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Re: Starch Pastes



Dear Ron and other starch paste users:
You wrote:
>I have a few probably silly questions:

Questions that we don't know the answers to are not silly.  There may be
others out there who are new to this art/craft and would benefit from our
*silly* questions, so ask away.

>Do you store the paste in a refrigerator or is it left at room temp.?

I only keep paste in the fridge if I don't plan to use it from one weekend
to the next.  If I will be using it every evening I leave it at room temp.
You can probably tell from this that I have a *job* besides book art.  I
liked Peter's suggestion in his post - cover the congealed paste with water
and refrigerate.  Sounds like a good idea.

>How long does it 'last' before degrading beyond use?

I have had paste last about 10 days, but it usually only lasts about a week.

>Do you add any preservatives (apparently not, but it doesn't hurt to ask :)

I don't bother with preservatives.  If my paste goes off I just mix up a new
batch.  It doesn't take long and is quite cheap.

>Is there a 'brand-name' starch you've found best?

My health food store sells it as a generic product, so I don't know where it
is made.  I have also used some from the asian market that was made in Thailand.

>Apparently all Asian starches .. rice too .. are 'stickier' than
>the others?  Wonder why?

Must be something to do with the variety of rice/wheat or the growing
conditions.

>I have wonderful Hawaiian relatives that much prefer
>*very* sticky rice .. far to 'gooey' for my western-taste.  At a recent
>wedding, I tried a bit of their steamed-rice on a couple place cards ..
>wow! .. strong bond, and very quick-setting!

I love sticky rice, but I wouldn't describe it as gooey - not the way my
Japanese friend makes it.  But I have had the rice you are describing in
Africa, where it becomes a mass of glue as it cooks.  Very unappetising.
When I cooked rice in Africa I rinsed the starch off in about 6 rinses of
cold water, to get it to be more like the western rice we are used to.

Kathy in Saskatchewan


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         khamre@eagle.wbm.ca
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