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Re: Fw: Papermaking



Lee,

Do you have the address of these places so I could write for a catalog?

Barbara
bholl@halcyon.com

On Wed, 30 Apr 1997, Lee Cooper wrote:

> I have been making paper in a blender for a couple of years.  Having just
> burnt out my second one I am in the process of trying to build a beater
> based on the Tightwad Beater shown in Lee MCDonald's North American Beater
> Review booklet, available from Carriage House Paper.  This is a good review
> of beaters, none really suited to the casual home user, but still worth
> shooting for I think.
>
> Still, I have had lots of fun experimenting with my blender paper.  I have
> used various plant fibers, lye boiled some seaweed, and bought some pulp
> from Lee.  Most of my base stock came from recycled office paper, certainly
> not "perfectly good" for anything else anymore and in plentiful supply.
> What you end up with is great paper for all kinds of projects including
> cards, notes, journals and book covers.  It is not archival quality but it
> IS fun.
>
> Get a catalog from Lee McDonald or Carraige House and get some pigments and
> other fun stuff and away you go.
>
> Lee Cooper
>
> ----------
> > From: Barbara Holl <bholl@HALCYON.COM>
> > To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Papermaking
> > Date: Wednesday, April 30, 1997 1:23 AM
> >
> > Daniel,
> >
> > I don't have the space to make paper from scratch, so to speak, but I do
> > recycle old papers into new, innovative papers.  I use them to make
> books,
> > use in layering in my rubber stamping and trade with others who also
> > recycle.
> >
> > Give it a try.  Just don't use construction paper.  You can even use
> dryer
> > lint!
> >
> > Barbara
> > bholl@halcyon.com
> >
> > On Tue, 29 Apr 1997, Daniel Warren wrote:
> >
> > > I've been dabbling in making some paper and have a question which must
> have
> > > been asked before.  Books I've read on the subject seem to be divided
> into
> > > to camps; those that describe the industrial process and those for the
> > > hobbyist which say things like "shred some paper and put it in the
> blender".
> > >
> > > I just don't see the aesthetic appeal of making paper out of perfectly
> > > good...paper.  But the processes described in the other books for
> pulping
> > > rags are way beyond what I can do at home. (where would I put a
> Hollander
> > > even if I could make one?)
> > >
> > > Just experimenting, by shredding cotton rags and boiling with lime for
> a
> > > couple hours, rinsing, and thowing the result (practically one piece at
> a
> > > time) into a blender I was able to make a product I believe is called
> "half
> > > stuff", i.e., their is no more "fabric" consistency to the mass but the
> > > fibers are still way to long and conglomerated to make paper with.
> > >
> > > So where does the enterprising amateur go from here?  Attempts at
> pounding
> > > with a wooden mallet just made a mess.  I figure if I could find a
> couple
> > > of, say, 12 inch gears I could make a small scale pulper, but those
> things
> > > aren't at ACE...
> > >
> > > Any ideas on getting the final pulp at home?
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > >
> > > Dan
> > > warrend@ridgecrest.ca.us
> > >
> > > Dan Warren
> > > warrend@ridgecrest.ca.us
> > >
>


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