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Re: Book restoration



          I have frequently convinced clients to leave well enough
          alone by making them a nice new BOX with shiny gold
          lettering on the spine for their repaired-but-not-rebound
          book.

          Barbara_Buchanan@pch.gc.ca

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Book restoration
Author:  rondelay@ONTHENET.COM.AU at PCH
Date:    15/10/97 9:20 AM







 About a year ago I was asked to repair an old book (Essai D'Anthropologie
 et d'Hygiene, avec planches, published Bruxelles, 1850.  Imprimerie et
 Lithographie de J. Vanbuggenhoudt).  I retained as much of the original as
 I could.The main repairs were replacing missing parts of the spine, and
 making leather corners as the corners of the original paper half binding
 had been damaged beyond repair.  The paper cover was retouched with
 matching colour  and lightly polished; edges of the block sanded to remove
 some of the grime; torn plates repaired, and new silk head bands made.  The
 gold tooling of the title and decoration on the false raised bands was very
 faint and no attempt was made to restore it. (My teacher thought I had done
 a good job.)
 The sum total of all this is - the client is disappointed!  He would like
 the tooling restored.  Without the same fonts etc. how could this be done?
 Should I have completely replaced the spine and paper covered boards, with
 something similar?I understand the current thinking on restoration is to
 save whatever can be saved.  Is this correct? Does anyone know what the
 value of this particular publication?
 I would be grateful to hear from members of the list concerning this vexing
 problem.  (I still have the book!)
 Vi Wilson
 WILSON   rondelay@onthenet.com.au


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