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Re: Amazon.com/returns policy



I think Jack has misunderstood charles's very important point.  If I am
right, the damage in question is not damaged books - it's the chains'
practice of buying lots of books to fill up their shelves, especially when
they expect something to sell.  Then the publisher needs to print more to
keep the title in stock.  Then the chains return lots of books (for full
refunds!) when they don't sell and the publisher is left holding the bill.
This may be old news for mass-market companies; it can be financial
disaster for small publishers who don't have deep pockets.
                     _________
|\        /|       /________/(
|  \    /  |      (________(/(___
|    \/    |    /_(________(/__/(
|   Judy   |   (______________(/(
|  Kerman  |   (Mayapple Press(/(
| Saginaw, |   (______________(/
 \   MI   /
   \    /       http://www.cris.com/~Jkerman
     \/

On Sun, 11 Jan 1998, Jack C. Thompson wrote:

> So far, that has only happened once.  A British book dealer who handles
> some of my titles returned a package of 10 copies of one title which had
> been damaged in shipping.
>
> I replaced the copies.
>
> Jack
>
> >Date:    Sat, 10 Jan 1998 09:55:13 -0700
> >From:    charles alexander <chax@THERIVER.COM>
> >Subject: Re: Amazon.com; a publisher's reply
>
> >And what is your policy on returns from these booksellers? I know that
> >massive returns from Barnes & Noble & Borders, specifically, have really
> >damaged a few small literary presses. Now, I think, those presses expect
> >and account for high rates of return from these booksellers.
> >
> >charles
>
> Thompson Conservation Laboratory
> Portland, Oregon  97217
>
> 503/735-3942  (voice/fax)
>
> www.teleport.com/~tcl
>


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