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Re: Early Paper Books?



At 10:09 AM 1/30/1998 -0700, you wrote:

>I know that by the third century, the codex and _parchment_ had increased
>in usage, thanks to the Roman empire, but that's hardly cheap materials.
>However, paper was invented back in the first century and there was a 600
>year period where the whole range of book-making technologies remained in
>popular use -- papyrus and parchment scrolls, papyrus codices, multi-leaf
>wax tablets, parchment and paper codices -- depending on your geographical
>location.

While it's true that it was invented early, it took (according to
PAPERMAKING; THE HISTORY AND TECHNIQUE OF AN ANCIENT CRAFT by Dard Hunter)
almost 1000 years to reach the West, appearing first in Spain.

 I'm not up on the latest research, but I think it would be
>plausible that there could have been an early adoption of a paper codex.

Again, no argument, but if so, wouldn't it have to have been in China ?
And I really doubt that there was much of a "christian" influence in China
in the first century.

>This book is an older one, but might help shed some light:
>
>Roberts, Colin H. and T.C. Skeats. The Birth of the Codex. Oxford: Oxford
>UP, 1987.
>
>Look forward to hearing more.
>
>Winston Pei
>
>

David Adams in Maryland


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