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Book Art



<< I don't think the first person to do a thing is the only one who can be
called an artist.>>
<<What we have in Book Art that is different from Artists' Books is that
BOOK ART is a MOVEMENT. Like Impressionism or Futurism, only without the
"ism.">>
<<It astounds me that anybody discussing the story of this movement could omit
Barton Lidice Benes, Stella Waitzkin, or Marty Greenbaum. Yet hundreds of
artists whose work is directly descended from their seminal creations have
never heard of them! >>

I also want to thank you, Richard, for your rant.  I don't know your barbed-
wire
book (though I have seen the explosive one), and just tossed that out as an
example of a nontraditional material.  If I use it again, I'll refer to you,
since I also believe in giving credit where it's due.  (There's a woman, whose
name I will NOT mention who has published a fancy, pretty coffetable type
manual on bookbinding who uses Heidi Kyle's structures without crediting her.)
On the other hand, with all art movements, there is the phenomenon of certain
ideas being "in the air".  In Art History classes, I was always skeptical
about this, but it has happened to me. In 1990 at the School of the Art
Institute, a woman at my final Thesis critique accused me of plagiarizing an
installation by the late Steven Cortright.  She had just been at a Book Arts
conference in NY and had seen slides of his.  I had never heard of Cortright
and shut her up by saying, "Maybe he saw MY work.", but I was quite upset and
afterwards went to my advisors.  They all apologized for not having pointed
out Cortright's work to me, but none of them knew of the installation the
woman had mentioned.  I got Steven Cortright's address, wrote to him, he
called me and we exchanged slides.  There were definite similarities in the
work and the thought processes behind it.  We were both kind of amazed and
began a correspondence- then suddenly I stopped hearing from him, and I
learned a while later that he had passed away.
The point being that what appears to be homage may not neccessarily be so.

Melissa jay Craig,
Chicago


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