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Re: Ink Jet Printers



This thread has been very interesting to follow. Obviously a lot of us
book folks have been printing on inkjets. I have used on old HP for
black and white and now have an Epson Stylus Color (one of the first
ones). They have only gotten better.

Of course, the big concern has to be the quality of the inks and as far
as I know they are not permanent. The only permanent inkjet inks I have
heard of are from a printer made by a company called LaserMaster. They
have a printer similar to an Iris printer called the DesignWinder. It
used 7 or 8 colors to print (shades of CMYK) and the inks are supposed
to be archival. This is something you would find at a service bureau and
not own. I think the paper width is about 28"-32". It is not cheap
output - but it is beatiful on various watercolour/printmaking papers.

Iris has promised archival inksets and as far as I know has not come up
with them - It sounds from comments here that other companies have
produced them for the Iris. That's great news. Iris prints on art papers
is a specialty and not available from all Iris printing service bureaus.
There are a few which specialized in fine art printing - Nash Studios in
California and there's one in Vermont or New Hampshire (I forget the
name).

The issue of colour fidelity has to do with calibrating your monitor
properly and then adjusting the colour translation from what you see to
what gets sent to your printer. If you work in Photoshop this is not
hard but tedious, somewhat obscure. Once done, the calibration can be
fairly accurate. Photoshop uses your calibration settings to translate
the image data from RGB to CMYK to give accurate matches.

You must remember that the video monitor creates colours from projected
Red Green and Blue while your printer is using Cyan Magenta Yellow and
Black pigments. There is physically no way that you can get a perfect
match. Some colors just do not print (called "out of gamut" for the
device or medium). This goes for offset printing as well as for
inexpensive desktop printers.

I could go on but I won't. Hope it's of interest.
--
Peter Sramek
Book°Sequence Gallery
http://www.interlog.com/~sramek
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