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Tyvek



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I had to chuckle at the inquiry about using Tyvek in books.  I have used it
periodically, mostly as a covering material I can paint in interesting
ways.  Also, I have some field scientists friends who need "waterproof"
books in the field.  But recently I had a very positive experience with
Tyvek as a book material.

I created a book that incorporates Tyvek that is making a splash in my town
right now.  I apologize for not being able to attach a photo but I will
describe.

Dream House is a tunnel book shaped like a house.  The box has a gabled
roof, front door with door handle and knocker and a window.  The "roof"
lifts off and inside is the house in it's wooden structural form (think
miniature 2x4's, yellow insulation and a vapor barrier).  It's built to
scale and showed wall construction with window and door headers.

The side accordions and the back of the book are Tyvek, which I have stamped
with the words "Dupont Tyvek".  The "pages" of the book are clear Mylar on
which I have drawn the building instructions for the foundation, walls, and
roof.  You look through the framed doorway or window to see the pages.  The
drawings are the same plans I submitted to the City of Anchorage to receive
my building permit.

The piece is approximately 15" x 13" and opens about 6" deep.

I entered this piece, along with two others,  in the statewide craft
exhibit, Earth, Fire and Fiber.  Interestingly,  this was the only piece
chosen - and it was awarded a $500.00 prize!  (My first prize, by the way).

Lloyd Herman, founding director of the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick
Gallery, jurored the show and I wondered what he had in mind.  I laughed
when I read the following comment in the interview published in the
Anchorage Daily News,

"Book art is another development of the past 20 years, he [the juror] said.
One $500 award went to Artemis BonaDea for her accordion structure "Dream
House," which employs a book motif and technology in pursuit of an
architectural theme.  Even the materials is innovative, Herman said, saying
of the artist's use of Tyvek house-wrap in her model, "I've never seen that
in any craft competition before."

So, Tyvek may not last through time, but can catch someone's attention!

Anyone else have Tyvek experiences?

Artemis



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<HTML>
I had to chuckle at the inquiry about using Tyvek in books.&nbsp; I have
used it periodically, mostly as a covering material I can paint in interesting
ways.&nbsp; Also, I have some field scientists friends who need "waterproof"
books in the field.&nbsp; But recently I had a very positive experience
with Tyvek as a book material.

<P>I created a book that incorporates Tyvek that is making a splash in
my town right now.&nbsp; I apologize for not being able to attach a photo
but I will describe.

<P><I>Dream House</I> is a tunnel book shaped like a house.&nbsp; The box
has a gabled roof, front door with door handle and knocker and a window.&nbsp;
The "roof" lifts off and inside is the house in it's wooden structural
form (think miniature 2x4's, yellow insulation and a vapor barrier).&nbsp;
It's built to scale and showed wall construction with window and door headers.

<P>The side accordions and the back of the book are Tyvek, which I have
stamped with the words "Dupont Tyvek".&nbsp; The "pages" of the book are
clear Mylar on which I have drawn the building instructions for the foundation,
walls, and roof.&nbsp; You look through the framed doorway or window to
see the pages.&nbsp; The drawings are the same plans I submitted to the
City of Anchorage to receive my building permit.

<P>The piece is approximately 15" x 13" and opens about 6" deep.

<P>I entered this piece, along with two others,&nbsp; in the statewide
craft exhibit, Earth, Fire and Fiber.&nbsp; Interestingly,&nbsp; this was
the only piece chosen - and it was awarded a $500.00 prize!&nbsp; (My first
prize, by the way).

<P>Lloyd Herman, founding director of the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick
Gallery, jurored the show and I wondered what he had in mind.&nbsp; I laughed
when I read the following comment in the interview published in the Anchorage
Daily News,

<P>"Book art is another development of the past 20 years, he [the juror]
said.&nbsp; One $500 award went to Artemis BonaDea for her accordion structure
"Dream House," which employs a book motif and technology in pursuit of
an architectural theme.&nbsp; Even the materials is innovative, Herman
said, saying of the artist's use of Tyvek house-wrap in her model, "I've
never seen that in any craft competition before."

<P>So, Tyvek may not last through time, but can catch someone's attention!

<P>Anyone else have Tyvek experiences?

<P>Artemis

<P>&nbsp;</HTML>

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