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Re: illustration print and basic typeset



Hi Laura -

George Roberts from Boise State taught a class he calls "non-toxic
lithography" a couple of weeks ago at Crow's Shadow Institute. He uses
commercial polyester plates that can be run through a laser printer or
photocopier (good for text) or drawn directly on with a variety of pens
(great for detailed illustrations).

The plate is simply wiped with a fountain solution, inked up and printed on
an etching or litho press.

I was really impressed with the results, and it is a very accessable
technique for someone who isn't necessarily a printmaker. And it is much
cheaper than making photopolymer plates.

Not sure how the plates would hold up to long runs, but for short runs, they
might be just the ticket.

I think George had an article in Printmaking Today last year outlining the
technique. You can probably contact him through the college too.

Roberta
paper@oregontrail.net



-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Lionson <llion@MAIL.ICONGRP.COM>
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
Date: Thursday, September 16, 1999 6:24 PM
Subject: illustration print and basic typeset


>I have heard you-all speak of different methods and types of ways of doing
>things,  but what I would like to ask is which method would be best for
what I
>am hoping to do.
>
>First question is:  Can anyone direct me to the direction of more
information
>on how to make a plate for the purposes of illustrating a small run book,
>Second question is:  Can anyone direct me to the appropriate information on
the
>easiest way to get started setting type?  Something less painful than
making a
>woodcut of each page yet not as expensive as buying one of those hotrod
>printing setups I've looked at on the web.
>
>I would like to step upward from publications run out of my laserprinter to
>publications made with real plates and type,  small-number editions done by
>myself by hand,  and any advice on where to start looking would be very
>appreciated.
>
>Also,  third question (or extention of first question):  Which method of
>illustration would work best for black line art -- metal with some form of
>etching,  woodcut,  or what?  I like to use delicate line art, is this
possible
>without investing in ultraexpensive equipment?  I would ideally like to
print
>the line art and then hand-color.
>
>I am a good illustrator but although I read most of the posts on this list
I
>still have great grinning gaps in my knowledge of print processes.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Laura
>
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      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                  <http://www.dreamscape.com/pdverhey>
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