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Latin Scholars?



 Well, Bob, you have a cultural problem as well as a linguistic one.
Romans didn't 'do' centuries as a measure of time, so there is no easy
Latin equivalent.  One can, of course, speak of groups of one hundred,
but it could be anything from guppies to solar systems.  Centuri, a
grouping of one hundred, would, to a Roman, be 100 soldeirs. Centum, the
ordinal 100 could be specific, one could say centum anni--100 years--
but primi centum (centum doesn't decline) anni, would, to a Roman, make
no sense. He would ask you "first from what?".  Romans dated events by
the consular year, on the Ides of March in the consulship of X and Y.
For major events or memorial commemoration, one can find A.U.C. dates,
but that is for ab urbe condita, from the founding of the city (Rome)
which, in our dating system, is 753 B.C.  So a roman date of, say,
A.U.C. 691 would be 63 B.C. to us.
  The whole business of dating from the birth of Christ doesn't come up
until good old Dionysius Exiguus concocts his Easter table for the
Church in 525 A.D. and even then he wasn't thinking of it as a whole
dating system.  He merely needed to establish a mathematical starting
point for "now" for the projection of his Easter calculations.  If he
had really been thinking of a calendrical system he would have dealt
with the year 0 problem and we wouldn't be having this debate about when
does the new millenium start.
  This is all pretty long winded, but I am sending it to the list
because I think it is a common problem that binders get asked to do
something "fancy" in Latin which is actually not all that easily done.
Depending on what the client is actually after, you might suggest
something more culturally than mathematically right.  Something like
"primum saeculum" perhaps??

  Dorothy Africa

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