[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: Early Printed Leaves



I think this Gentleman is to be commended for this approach to teaching. A
person learns by getting to know the subject. Not just mimicking an
instructor.

I have for several years done what I call "Reprints". I find old broadsides,
billheads, and title pages which appear interesting to me. I then set the
form again in old type, and print it on an archival paper using 18th and
19th century printing equipment. I always knew I liked this approach to
preservation. Now I know why I felt that way.

Thanks for sharing that thought.

aj

----- Original Message -----
From: Paula Marie Gourley <RELIURE@AOL.COM>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2000 3:06 PM
Subject: Re: Early Printed Leaves


> The subject at hand, with discussion initiated by Mr. Otten's query,
brought
> to mind a possible solution. When Gabriel Rummonds and I worked together,
> years ago at the U of Alabama, he taught an excellent course on
Descriptive
> Bibliography. The charge to the students enrolled in the course (and in
the
> book arts program at the time) was to select pages from historical texts,
> research all aspects of the design and production of these, and to
reproduce
> them as exactly as possible.
>
> The students who pursued the assignments went from study of reproductions
and
> other documentation of the original work to making (or selecting)
facsimile
> paper, duplicating illustrations via having magnesium plates made or
carving
> their own woodcuts to selecting type and setting it by hand and then
printing
> on cast-iron platen presses to reproduce the originals as exactly as
> possible. The results were historically accurate, brilliantly produced and
> most impressive.
>
> This kind of project - where one actually duplicates, through scholarship,
> artisanry and craft - a work of historical significance, would provide
> tremendous satisfaction, enhance the maker's breadth of skill and
knowledge,
> as well as maintaining integrity throughout. Everyone wins. Books are
> preserved, learning occurs and the historical crafts of the book are
served,
> respected and perpetuated.
>
> Just a thought...that sometimes, it's perhaps better - and appropriate -
to
> do the work it takes to produce things the old-fashioned way.
>
> Paula Marie Gourley
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>              ***********************************************
>

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]