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Something for the beginners among us.



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This is perhaps old stuff among most readers of the List, but I solved a =
very simple, but vexing problem the other day and thought I'd share it =
anyway.

I get a fair number of books to repair which require mending a tear or =
constructing a new edge on a ratted page using Japanese mending paper =
which is fine enough to be transluscent, allowing the printing to be =
readable when dry. =20

The problem has been that often this paper is so fine that, once pasted, =
it is difficult, if not impossible to handle.  It either tears or curls =
along its length making the process of getting it off the pasting =
surface and onto the page a frustrating challenge.

The light went on last week in this situation as I was using small 1/2" =
square pieces of such paper to reattach bits of text which had become =
separated from the page.  I wound up pasting the patch on a piece of wax =
paper a couple of times larger that the patch, and simply turning it =
over onto the tear, pressing the patch down carefully so as not to move =
the fragment.  The wax paper peeled neatly off the patch, and the mend =
was done.  The wax paper could also be left on, the piece put between a =
couple of blotters and a weight and allowed to dry under pressure.  But =
the process of pasting and handling delicate tissue seems much easier =
now.

A simple idea, but wish I'd thought of it a couple of years ago.

Charles Schermerhorn

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<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV>This is perhaps old stuff among most readers of the List, but I =
solved a=20
very simple, but vexing problem the other day and thought I'd share it=20
anyway.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I get a fair number of books to repair which require mending a tear =
or=20
constructing a new edge on a ratted page using Japanese mending paper =
which is=20
fine enough to be transluscent, allowing the printing to be readable =
when=20
dry.&nbsp; </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>The problem has been that often this paper is so fine that, once =
pasted, it=20
is difficult, if not impossible to handle.&nbsp; It either tears or =
curls along=20
its length making the process of getting it off the pasting surface and =
onto the=20
page a frustrating challenge.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>The light went on last week in this situation as I was using small =
1/2"=20
square pieces of such paper to reattach bits of text which had become =
separated=20
from the page.&nbsp; I wound up pasting the patch on a piece of wax =
paper a=20
couple of times larger that the patch, and simply turning it over onto =
the tear,=20
pressing the patch down carefully so as not to move the fragment.&nbsp; =
The wax=20
paper peeled neatly off the patch, and the mend was done.&nbsp; The wax =
paper=20
could also be left on, the piece put between a couple of blotters and a =
weight=20
and allowed to dry under pressure.&nbsp; But the process of pasting and =
handling=20
delicate tissue seems much easier now.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>A simple idea, but wish I'd thought of it a couple of years =
ago.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Charles Schermerhorn</DIV></BODY></HTML>

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