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Re: Book Art Criticism: New Thoughts



Aesthetically, one would have to presume the existence of the
mundane as a gauge by which to measure greatness.
Idealism is not pure unto itself, rather it is the rising above
the fray of "average" thinking that makes one an idealist.
One can live in either good or bad faith and still be considered
an idealist or "genius."

Socrates is a genius to all generations but his own, this is what
sets the aesthetic apart from the ordinary.  But can this or a similar
theory be applied in the post modern sense?  Aren't there truly
aesthetic bookartists out there?  And isn't it the "average" book
qua book that enables their art to be singled out and set apart?

Economics has very little influence on the aesthetic, save the necessary
funds by which to practice your craft, Michelangelo, while relatively
poor
relied upon the wealth of Popes and Doges to keep his art alive, even if,
as conjectured in "The Agony and the Ecstasy" that he suffered for the
sake
of beauty.  Van Gogh suffered for beauty as well, didn't he?  And doesn't
the
works of Michelangelo and Van Gogh transcend the "mediocrity" of their
contemporary "hacks?"  The work of the "average" is necessary so as to
permit the truly gifted to excel.

This is why I am perfectly content to be among the 40 to 60 percentile in
the
craft and art, not necessarily a genius, but happy to do what I am able
to do
with the limited resources available to me.

Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa if I offended any by appearing
"maudlin" in my last post, I was just attempting to illustrate that we
are all
just a little bungled and botched when it comes to existing in the human
condition,
just some of us have it better than others, some are not as bungled
and/or botched
as I seem to be.

All I ask for is tolerance and peace among the participants of this list,
tell me to shut up, or to unsubscribe if you must, but let there be some
semblance of reasonableness and ethical caring among us, especially
as we relate to the Other(s) out there in cyberspace.  None of us can
presume to know the state of mind or consciousness of the "Other" out
there, so please don't throw your words around loosely.  Sometimes
feelings and sensitivity is all a person has.

I'll shut up now.

Rommel

Baltimore, MD

On Fri, 1 Sep 2000 15:49:05 -0400 Michael Brady <jbrady@EMAIL.UNC.EDU>
writes:
>Richard,
>
>>   Is the economic position of the artist a factor? Is work made from
>bourgeois
>>   necessity different from work made for idealistic (aesthetic,
>ethical) reasons?
>
>Ages-old questions. Got answers?
>
>
>-------------------
>Michael Brady
>16 Pedestal Rock Lane
>Durham, NC 27712
>Voice  919 471 9554    fax 919 962 2707
>jbrady@email.unc.edu   http://www.unc.edu/~jbrady/index.html
>
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             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
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