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Re: Computers and books



Photoshop is one of the most complicated programs available, but also
powerful and somewhat easy to use, even for those of us who hardly
scratch its (many) surfaces.
Layers have been available since the beginning of the program and now,
since version 4.0, they are much easier to use. I'm at 5.0 and the
newest version is 6.0, so you can sort of judge where my expertise
lies.
In my version, I have up to 99 layers and each one is created by a
simple click of the mouse. It can contain *any* portion of an image,
and it can be transparent or opaque, or temporarily invisible. The
purpose of all these layers is more mundane -- if you make a mistake
in say, the text on an image, you can fix just it, without your
background getting all smudged up.
In practice, artists have really gone to town with this feature, as
you can imagine, for static images. However, if you want to make your
presentation come alive and your livestock jump through hoops, you'll
want to import your Photoshop images (flattened or layered, depending)
into something like Flash or Director, or even something more basic
like the old school standby, HyperStudio.
No matter how flashy, however, movement is always just a version of a
flip book: multiple images that change slightly and are presented to
the eye in a rapid stream.
Hope some of this helps. If you're going to upgrade and you're on a
Mac, I can be some help. I'm planning to do the same.

Nancy B.

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