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Re: Permanence vs. Impermanence



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Kevin Driedger wrote:

> I have to admit that, when I encounter this desire for permanence, my
> kneejerk response is to devise highly volatile books. Books which
> disintegrate as you read them. But that is only my reactionary self.
>
> I am not all opposed to people striving to do quality work, or being aware
> of the results of the technology they use. I'm just curious why we value
> permanence over impermanence

Dorothy Africa wrote:

>    One could argue that the quest of permanence in art is ultimately an
> expression
> of vanity, the desire to leave a mark in history or influence future
> generations
> being a desire for earthly immortality.  However, if it is vanity it is so
> basically human I can't really see it as some sort of moral defect myself.
> ...
>    So, it may not be what every digital book artist wants to hear, but in a
> hundred years your book may not matter a jot for its content,  just for the
> fact
> of its survival.

In addition to vanity, investment value enters in. How many have made millions
off the lasting work of an artist who died in poverty? My grudging response is
YES, let the work deteriorate before investors can profit more than the artist
ever did.

Granted, beautiful centuries-old objects are awe-inspiring, but to me at least
decades-old, years-old, or days-old decaying items can be at least as beautiful
and awe-inspiring. We ourselves are decaying all our lives. Impermanent objects
are metaphors for the human condition, as valuable as so-called "permanent"
objects.

Rhonda Boothe


rhonda j. boothe
nothing spectacular graphics (humility at its finest)
3214 preble street
bremerton, wa  98312-4535


Visit your granny.
Granny Artemis Home Page
www.drizzle.com/~rhondaj


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<html>
Kevin Driedger wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>I have to admit that, when I encounter this desire
for permanence, my
<br>kneejerk response is to devise highly volatile books. Books which
<br>disintegrate as you read them. But that is only my reactionary self.
<p>I am not all opposed to people striving to do quality work, or being
aware
<br>of the results of the technology they use. I'm just curious why we
value
<br>permanence over impermanence</blockquote>
Dorothy Africa wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>&nbsp;&nbsp; One could argue that the quest of permanence
in art is ultimately an expression
<br>of vanity, the desire to leave a mark in history or influence future
generations
<br>being a desire for earthly immortality.&nbsp; However, if it is vanity
it is so
<br>basically human I can't really see it as some sort of moral defect
myself.&nbsp; ...
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; So, it may not be what every digital book artist wants
to hear, but in a
<br>hundred years your book may not matter a jot for its content,&nbsp;
just for the fact
<br>of its survival.</blockquote>

<p><br>In addition to vanity, investment value enters in. How many have
made millions off the lasting work of an artist who died in poverty? My
grudging response is YES, let the work deteriorate before investors can
profit more than the artist ever did.
<p>Granted, beautiful centuries-old objects are awe-inspiring, but to me
at least decades-old, years-old, or days-old decaying items can be at least
as beautiful and awe-inspiring. We ourselves are decaying all our lives.
Impermanent objects are metaphors for the human condition, as valuable
as so-called "permanent" objects.
<p>Rhonda Boothe
<br>&nbsp;
<p>rhonda j. boothe
<br>nothing spectacular graphics <font size=-1>(humility at its finest)</font>
<br>3214 preble street
<br>bremerton, wa&nbsp; 98312-4535
<br>&nbsp;
<p><i>Visit your granny.</i>
<br><b>Granny Artemis Home Page</b>
<br><a href="/www.drizzle.com/~rhondaj">www.drizzle.com/~rhondaj</a>
<br>&nbsp;</html>

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