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Re: Maril -> patents...



To quote from the Designer Bookbinders Newsletter, Autumn 2000, reporting
on Philip Smith's lecture. Excerpted from Dominic Riley's article.

"Perhaps more controversial than his approach to spirituality though is his
habit, over the years, of taking out patents on techniques that he has
either devised or revived. When asked aobut his motivation of patenting
"maril," for example, he replied that as the inventor of the technique, he
should have the "first bite of the cherry." It was suggested that if others
had been able to use it we have have seen the technique adapt or improve,
and examples where cited where other binders who were playing with the idea
at around the same time had to change it sufficiently so as not to incur
the wrath of the patent holder.

Another distinguished binder in the audience reflected on her own
experience of having made a lap-back binding years ago as a solution to a
problem, and wondered how this might have been compromised if it had been
done after Philip had taken out his patent. These questions, although
briefly debated among the audience, were not resolved, and it seems that a
further discussion of patenting withing the hand crafts would be profitable."

It is something which would be interesting to debate. What is the law on
patents. One can certainly experiment with the technique on one's own,
profiting from that would be iffy. What about exhibiting?...

During my stint at Gaylord I was confronted with a patent held by LBS in
Iowa on a sew in pamphlet binder. The only thing that distinguished from
any other patent binder structurally was the fact that the inner cloth
hinge had a self-adhesive applied so that after it was sewn, all the
"binder" had to do was peel off the release paper and put it down...
Gaylord had come up with something similar that they had to withdraw. In
terms of materials it used their patented coated barrier board. You can see
the patent at <http://www.delphion.com/details?pn=US04741655__>. The US
Patent Office has it with images at:
<http://164.195.100.11/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=/net
ahtml/search-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=ft90&s1=pamphlet.TTL.&s2=binde
r.TTL.&OS=TTL/pamphlet+AND+TTL/binder&RS=TTL/pamphlet+AND+TTL/binder>

While truely original ideas should be protected, and maril fits, I have a
real problem with patents on long established techniques and structures.
Some are also just plain silly. Remember, everything we do is derived from
something though, somewhere...

p.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Philobiblon: Book Arts, Different By Design
Hand Binding, Conservation, and Project Websites
Peter D. Verheyen
<mailto:verheyen@philobiblon.com>
<http://www.philobiblon.com/philobiblon>
<Fax: 612.632.3718>

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