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Re: Bleach



Yes that 'do we want our work to last' is an interesting question.  Especially
when one considers that some artists work deliberately in non permanent mediums
like chocolate - they create art intending that the art is to be eaten!! (In the
area where I live we have an arts center that regularly has a chocolate
festival/edibile art exhibit)

There are any number of art works of all mediums that are intended by their
creators to not 'last', or to 'last' only for a while.
Which that brings us to the use of 'time' as an artistic medium - but that's
another email.  <smile>

Consider artist Richard Long's work in natural elements (stones, water etc.).  He
constructs these 'sculptures' often in inaccessible locations. The art is
vulnerable to wind, rain, soil erosion, vandalism etc. and frequently the most
'lasting' element of the artwork is the books that he makes about the process of
creating his art.

Sue Clancy


James Tapley wrote:

> So the question is also one of "do we want our work to last and in what
> condition?";
> who of us can accurately predict what the future, even tomorrow, will find of
> interest and value?
> For myself, I simply don't believe in doing throwaways, and because I spend
> much of my working life in attempts to slow and ameliorate the effects of
> aging, environment, etc., on works of "art", I've a vested interest in trying
> to get artists to be a bit more careful in their choice of materials and
> methods. As do the admirers and purchasers of those artists' works. This is
> an admittedly "old fogey" point of view.
> Fifteen years, even fifty, is not a very long time in the life of most
> "things". There is an interesting piece in the NYTimes on attempts to deal
> with the novel conservation problems posed by much postwar art:
> http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/05/arts/05REST.html?searchpv=site06
> which though brief, at least gives a hint of what's involved.
> As Chris Clarkson, one my personal "gods" of twentieth century bookbinding
> and conservation, has pointed out often, there is far too little connection
> between most modern bookmaking and conservation. To my mind, this is a
> detriment to both fields.
> I believe that those of us who work in the book arts have a very real
> responsibility to ourselves and others to do our work in the very best way we
> know, if only to spare some future overworked conservator (it COULD be me in
> ten years) the problems of degradation we sometimes build into our work. Best
> James
>
> James Tapley Hand Bookbinder
> 2077 Thirteenth Street
> Sarasota, Florida
> 34237   USA
>
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