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REPOSTING: Addressograph/'Lavador Technique'



here you go....scroll down for the how-to!

jcat


On Tue, 6 Mar 2001, RLavadour wrote:

> Thanks for bringing this up Peter - I'm always fascinated with the ways that
> ideas are developed and the idea that several different people might end up
> solving a problem the same way or make the same discoveries, each on their
> own.
>
> Being out in a rural area where I'm usually working on my own, and having a
> brain that works similar to a little hampster wheel in perpetual, if
> sometimes erratic, motion, I'm always trying out weird things and having to
> solve problems with what's at hand. It can be a bummer to think that I've
> come up with truly innovative techniques (fabric paint for making
> watermarks!) only to find that other people have already done the same
> thing. BUT, it's also very exciting to make discoveries and satisfying to
> have gone through the process on my own. (I'm sure that's what contributes
> to my lack of patience with adult students who want everything handed over
> to them instead of figuring out some things for themselves...)
>
> I can see where claiming ownership to a structure or technique would up a
> person's reputation and afford more opportunities in terms of teaching,
> etc., but what gets tiring is hearing over and over, "Oh, (snear) he ripped
> that off from so and so...", as if two (or ten, or a hundred) people
> couldn't possible come up with the same or similar idea, combination,
> question, approach, etc.
>
> On the other hand, do artists have a responsibility to know what is
> happening and has happened in their field so that they aren't re-hashing
> already tried ideas? Between good books and the web, people who are isolated
> from collections and exhibitions can at least get a feel for the history of
> artist's books and what's going on out there now. Or, does it matter? If
> you're compelled to make work of any kind, should you be required to get
> 'permission' so you don't step on any toes?
>
> And how much credit should be given to the 'originators' of different
> structures? I've always been taught that it's good form to credit Gary Frost
> when using his sewn board binding and Hedi Kyle when working with 'flag'
> books".
>
> I'm very interested in everyone's thoughts on this.
>
> Here's one discovery I'm happy to share - I'm sure I'm not the only person
> to cook this up, but if you could always and forever refer to it as the
> Lavadour Technique, I'd appreciate it. (just kidding...)
>
> Take an old manual visa imprinter (you can usually find them on ebay for a
> buck or two by searching 'addressograph') and remove the plate that has the
> raised numbers and merchant information. By looking at the rollers
> underneath and experimenting a little, you can plot out your printing area
> and mark it on the 'bed' with a pencil.
>
> Create your text with a hand-held label maker - the old kind with the raised
> letters. (I showed this to some third graders last year and not one of them
> had ever seen a manual visa machine or the label maker - scary) Peel the
> back off the labels and attach them to the 'bed' of the press.
>
> Go to the bank and ask for a couple packages of visa drafts. They will
> usually give them to you - a couple hundred in a pack - as not many
> merchants use the old style forms anymore.
>
> Cut Japanese or similarly thin paper to the size of the visa drafts. These
> drafts are usually a sandwich of carbon backed paper with a cardstock copy
> on the bottom. Remove the bottom copy and replace it with the Japanese
> paper.
>
> Place the draft and paper in the printer and move the top handle back and
> forth over the top, as you would to imprint a visa card.
>
> You can get a few copies out of each carbon before you need to change it. A
> fun way to add text to multiples, and I'm pretty sure the carbon is pretty
> stable.
>
> I haven't taken more time to play around with this, but I'm sure you could
> make 'plates' out of tons of stuff for images and textures - lace doilies,
> copper tooling foil with a stylus drawn over the back - anything you can
> take a rubbing off of that will be 'type high' for this little imprinter.
>
> True, you are stuck with a miniature format, but what the heck.
>
> Best wishes,
> Roberta
>
> Pendleton, Oregon
> paper@oregontrail.net
> http://www.missioncreekpress.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Peter Verheyen <verheyen@PHILOBIBLON.COM>
> To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
> Date: Tuesday, March 06, 2001 8:13 AM
> Subject: Re: Maril -> patents...
>
>
> >To quote from the Designer Bookbinders Newsletter, Autumn 2000, reporting
> >on Philip Smith's lecture. Excerpted from Dominic Riley's article.
> >
> >"Perhaps more controversial than his approach to spirituality though is his
> >habit, over the years, of taking out patents on techniques that he has
> >either devised or revived. When asked aobut his motivation of patenting
> >"maril," for example, he replied that as the inventor of the technique, he
> >should have the "first bite of the cherry." It was suggested that if others
> >had been able to use it we have have seen the technique adapt or improve,
> >and examples where cited where other binders who were playing with the idea
> >at around the same time had to change it sufficiently so as not to incur
> >the wrath of the patent holder.
> >
> >Another distinguished binder in the audience reflected on her own
> >experience of having made a lap-back binding years ago as a solution to a
> >problem, and wondered how this might have been compromised if it had been
> >done after Philip had taken out his patent. These questions, although
> >briefly debated among the audience, were not resolved, and it seems that a
> >further discussion of patenting withing the hand crafts would be
> profitable."
> >
> >It is something which would be interesting to debate. What is the law on
> >patents. One can certainly experiment with the technique on one's own,
> >profiting from that would be iffy. What about exhibiting?...
> >
> >During my stint at Gaylord I was confronted with a patent held by LBS in
> >Iowa on a sew in pamphlet binder. The only thing that distinguished from
> >any other patent binder structurally was the fact that the inner cloth
> >hinge had a self-adhesive applied so that after it was sewn, all the
> >"binder" had to do was peel off the release paper and put it down...
> >Gaylord had come up with something similar that they had to withdraw. In
> >terms of materials it used their patented coated barrier board. You can see
> >the patent at <http://www.delphion.com/details?pn=US04741655__>. The US
> >Patent Office has it with images at:
> ><http://164.195.100.11/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=/ne
> t
> >ahtml/search-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=ft90&s1=pamphlet.TTL.&s2=bind
> e
> >r.TTL.&OS=TTL/pamphlet+AND+TTL/binder&RS=TTL/pamphlet+AND+TTL/binder>
> >
> >While truely original ideas should be protected, and maril fits, I have a
> >real problem with patents on long established techniques and structures.
> >Some are also just plain silly. Remember, everything we do is derived from
> >something though, somewhere...
> >
> >p.
> >
> >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >Philobiblon: Book Arts, Different By Design
> >Hand Binding, Conservation, and Project Websites
> >Peter D. Verheyen
> ><mailto:verheyen@philobiblon.com>
> ><http://www.philobiblon.com/philobiblon>
> ><Fax: 612.632.3718>
> >
> >             ***********************************************
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>
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>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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