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Re: letterpress...



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          CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
           See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

Hi Scott,
Thanks bunches!!  I've looked at the site - and boy I've got some reading to
do!!
Thank you again!!

Sue

Scott Young wrote:

>              ***********************************************
>           CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
>            See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>              ***********************************************
>
> Hi Sue!
> For a start, check out http://members.aol.com/aapa96/lpress.html for some
> resources for letterpress printing/presses. You may also want to do a search
> for letterpress on the net - lot of resources and info out there.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Sue Clancy <artist@TELEPATH.COM>
> To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
> Sent: Friday, October 05, 2001 4:32 PM
> Subject: Re: letterpress...
>
> >              ***********************************************
> >           CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
> >            See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
> >                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >              ***********************************************
> >
> > Ah yes, Thank you very much for the explanation!!!
> > I hadn't found any answers in my Printing books - your explanation sortof
> > explains why <grin>
> > Letterpress doesn't seem to be a technique in use by 'modern' printers -
> I've
> > read of and experienced to a degree (from a pre-press/graphic design
> standpoint)
> > the Photolithography process'.  Of course the Desktop Publishing arena is
> very
> > familiar.
> >
> > Are letterpress machines considered 'antique' in some circles?? (Not
> meaning to
> > offend, just seeking explanation as to why I may have missed any mention
> of this
> > technique in my Commercial Art training... etc.)
> > I know that I've introduced myself to Lino-cut printing, and Block
> printing as
> > well as 'rubber stamping' as a result of my Book Arts work - these
> techniques
> > weren't really mentioned in school as 'contemporary' (as you can imagine).
> So
> > I'm wondering if these older methods of creating reproductions (etching,
> stone
> > Litho, and etc.) are being 'revived' by Book Artists???
> >
> > Any thoughts????
> >
> > Also, any ideas about how one finds a Letterpress - either to own or to
> 'rent'
> > or to commission work from the owner of said Letterpress? Or even just to
> visit
> > to see in working progress?  Anyone in Oklahoma??
> >
> > Thanks again,
> >
> > Sue Clancy - a fairly new 'maker of Artist's Books' full of curiosity who
> lives
> > in Oklahoma....
> >
> >
> > Michael Brady wrote:
> >
> > >              ***********************************************
> > >           CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
> > >            See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
> > >                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> > >              ***********************************************
> > >
> > > Sue
> > > >   Hi, I'm a lurker on this list and I've a burning question.
> > > >   What exactly is Letterpress?  Where does one buy a 'letterpress'
> machine
> > > >   or whatever it is that enables one to create and print words on a
> > > >   page???
> > >
> > > It's a press that prints with three-dimensional type on which the ink is
> > > rolled and then the paper pressed down. It's the kind of press you see
> in
> > > Western movies with the guy ratcheting down a press (like a wine
> press!);
> > > it's the kind of press you see in Albrecht Durer engravings showing
> > > Gutenberg's Bible. It's the clattery press in the old movies about
> Hearst
> > > and newspapers in the 1910s.
> > >
> > > In printing, there are three (and now four) processes:
> > >
> > > Intaglio, in which the the ink-bearing parts of the image are below the
> > > printing surface, and the ink is transferred by pressure when the paper
> is
> > > pressed against it. Etchings are intaglio. Paper money is printed from
> > > intaglio plates.
> > >
> > > The relief process (which is what letterpress is), in which the image
> (in
> > > this case, type) is raised and the ink is rolled onto the surface. Then
> the
> > > paper is pressed against it.
> > >
> > > Planar, which is what lithography is. In this process, the completely
> flat
> > > printing surface is prepared in a certain way so that when it is inked,
> the
> > > ink is kept in certain areas and repelled in other. Then the paper is
> > > pressed against it and the image appears. Photolithography (most the
> high
> > > quality printing is photolitho) is the most common form, although true
> stone
> > > lithography is still used in certain instances. SIlkscreening is a form
> of
> > > planar printing. Xerography (almost all digital laser printers are
> > > xerographic, except the ink-jet and bubble-jet kinds; see below) is a
> form
> > > of planar printing.
> > >
> > > In the fourth method, the printing implement doesn't actually touch the
> > > paper. Ink jet is such a method.
> > >
> > > -------------------
> > > Michael Brady
> > > jbrady@email.unc.edu   http://www.unc.edu/~jbrady/index.html
> > >
> > >              ***********************************************
> > >             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> > >       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
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> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> >       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> >             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> >                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >
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> >
> >
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
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             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
        UNSUB Book_Arts-L AND SEND TO: LISTSERV@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
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