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Re: letterpress...



             ***********************************************
          CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
           See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

Sue,

In your research you will find that many of the terms used in current
graphic design computer programs like Quark come directly from the old
letterpress terms. En space and Em space were actual pieces of lead inserted
to create a specific space between letters. Points and picas were
measurements for lead type and their spacing. "Leading" is still used to
describe the space between lines that formerly would have been created by
inserting a strip of lead.

Mare

on 10/5/01 5:48 PM, Sue Clancy at artist@TELEPATH.COM wrote:

> ***********************************************
> CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
> See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> ***********************************************
>
> Hi Scott,
> Thanks bunches!!  I've looked at the site - and boy I've got some reading to
> do!!
> Thank you again!!
>
> Sue
>
> Scott Young wrote:
>
>> ***********************************************
>> CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
>> See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
>> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>> ***********************************************
>>
>> Hi Sue!
>> For a start, check out http://members.aol.com/aapa96/lpress.html for some
>> resources for letterpress printing/presses. You may also want to do a search
>> for letterpress on the net - lot of resources and info out there.
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: Sue Clancy <artist@TELEPATH.COM>
>> To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
>> Sent: Friday, October 05, 2001 4:32 PM
>> Subject: Re: letterpress...
>>
>>> ***********************************************
>>> CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
>>> See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
>>> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>> ***********************************************
>>>
>>> Ah yes, Thank you very much for the explanation!!!
>>> I hadn't found any answers in my Printing books - your explanation sortof
>>> explains why <grin>
>>> Letterpress doesn't seem to be a technique in use by 'modern' printers -
>> I've
>>> read of and experienced to a degree (from a pre-press/graphic design
>> standpoint)
>>> the Photolithography process'.  Of course the Desktop Publishing arena is
>> very
>>> familiar.
>>>
>>> Are letterpress machines considered 'antique' in some circles?? (Not
>> meaning to
>>> offend, just seeking explanation as to why I may have missed any mention
>> of this
>>> technique in my Commercial Art training... etc.)
>>> I know that I've introduced myself to Lino-cut printing, and Block
>> printing as
>>> well as 'rubber stamping' as a result of my Book Arts work - these
>> techniques
>>> weren't really mentioned in school as 'contemporary' (as you can imagine).
>> So
>>> I'm wondering if these older methods of creating reproductions (etching,
>> stone
>>> Litho, and etc.) are being 'revived' by Book Artists???
>>>
>>> Any thoughts????
>>>
>>> Also, any ideas about how one finds a Letterpress - either to own or to
>> 'rent'
>>> or to commission work from the owner of said Letterpress? Or even just to
>> visit
>>> to see in working progress?  Anyone in Oklahoma??
>>>
>>> Thanks again,
>>>
>>> Sue Clancy - a fairly new 'maker of Artist's Books' full of curiosity who
>> lives
>>> in Oklahoma....
>>>
>>>
>>> Michael Brady wrote:
>>>
>>>> ***********************************************
>>>> CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
>>>> See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
>>>> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>>> ***********************************************
>>>>
>>>> Sue
>>>>> Hi, I'm a lurker on this list and I've a burning question.
>>>>> What exactly is Letterpress?  Where does one buy a 'letterpress'
>> machine
>>>>> or whatever it is that enables one to create and print words on a
>>>>> page???
>>>>
>>>> It's a press that prints with three-dimensional type on which the ink is
>>>> rolled and then the paper pressed down. It's the kind of press you see
>> in
>>>> Western movies with the guy ratcheting down a press (like a wine
>> press!);
>>>> it's the kind of press you see in Albrecht Durer engravings showing
>>>> Gutenberg's Bible. It's the clattery press in the old movies about
>> Hearst
>>>> and newspapers in the 1910s.
>>>>
>>>> In printing, there are three (and now four) processes:
>>>>
>>>> Intaglio, in which the the ink-bearing parts of the image are below the
>>>> printing surface, and the ink is transferred by pressure when the paper
>> is
>>>> pressed against it. Etchings are intaglio. Paper money is printed from
>>>> intaglio plates.
>>>>
>>>> The relief process (which is what letterpress is), in which the image
>> (in
>>>> this case, type) is raised and the ink is rolled onto the surface. Then
>> the
>>>> paper is pressed against it.
>>>>
>>>> Planar, which is what lithography is. In this process, the completely
>> flat
>>>> printing surface is prepared in a certain way so that when it is inked,
>> the
>>>> ink is kept in certain areas and repelled in other. Then the paper is
>>>> pressed against it and the image appears. Photolithography (most the
>> high
>>>> quality printing is photolitho) is the most common form, although true
>> stone
>>>> lithography is still used in certain instances. SIlkscreening is a form
>> of
>>>> planar printing. Xerography (almost all digital laser printers are
>>>> xerographic, except the ink-jet and bubble-jet kinds; see below) is a
>> form
>>>> of planar printing.
>>>>
>>>> In the fourth method, the printing implement doesn't actually touch the
>>>> paper. Ink jet is such a method.
>>>>
>>>> -------------------
>>>> Michael Brady
>>>> jbrady@email.unc.edu   http://www.unc.edu/~jbrady/index.html
>>>>
>>>> ***********************************************
>>>> BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>>>> For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>>>> resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>>>> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>>>
>>>> To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
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>>>> Or click here <mailto:listserv@listserv.syr.edu?body=unsub book_arts-l>
>>>> ***********************************************
>>>
>>> ***********************************************
>>> BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>>> For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>>> resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>>> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
>>> UNSUB Book_Arts-L AND SEND TO: LISTSERV@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
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>>> ***********************************************
>>>
>>>
>>
>> ***********************************************
>> BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>> For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>> resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>
>> To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
>> UNSUB Book_Arts-L AND SEND TO: LISTSERV@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>> Or click here <mailto:listserv@listserv.syr.edu?body=unsub book_arts-l>
>> ***********************************************
>
> ***********************************************
> BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
> To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
> UNSUB Book_Arts-L AND SEND TO: LISTSERV@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
> Or click here <mailto:listserv@listserv.syr.edu?body=unsub book_arts-l>
> ***********************************************

--
MaryAnn "Mare" O'Toole
Director of Academic Computing
The Art Institute of Boston at
Lesley University
700 Beacon Street
Boston, MA 02215
617 585-6661
otoole@aiboston
otoole@gis.net
zazencoyot@yahoo.com
---

FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION.  It comes bundled with the software.

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
        UNSUB Book_Arts-L AND SEND TO: LISTSERV@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
 Or click here <mailto:listserv@listserv.syr.edu?body=unsub book_arts-l>
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