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Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 10 Dec 2001 to 11 Dec 2001 (#2001-333) scanning slides



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I have a film scanner, but it only does 35mm slides and film. I have lots of
old family negatives in various large formats like 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 . Since
large format film scanners are much too expensive for hobby use, I do the
following:

0. Take the cover off the flatbed scanner.

1. put the negative on the flatbed scanner.

2. put a glass sheet on top to flatten the negative

3. put a piece of milky translucent plastic - from a fluorescent light
fixture in my case - on top - to diffuse the light.

4. Shine a bright light - I use a bright halogen light - on top of the
diffusing plastic. The light must be bright enough to overpower the internal
light - I can't turn that off.

5. Scan the picture and invert the picture (convert to positive) in your
software.

Some notes:

1. This does not work too well on smaller negative sizes because the
resolution of most scanners is just not high enough.

2. I notice some very slight ridges which I think are caused by the light
source flickering with the power supply. Perhaps really fussy persons could
use a car light bulb and battery.

3. This works well with b&W negatives, but I have not been successful with
colour negatives. You have to adjust the colour balance to remove the orange
mask, then invert the colours; this doesn't work out very well. Also, the
contrast seems very low. Perhaps there is a colour temperature problem with
the light, one reason for using a halogen bulb.

4. In the case of slides, I suspect you would have to remove the slide from
the mount first, to flatten the film and press it against the flatbed glass.

The above is not perfect but works well enough for home use and to recover
those pictures your relatives stripped out of those old photo albums...


> >You can scan slides on flatbeds, but only if you have a dedicated
> >slide scanning attachment, since that shines light _through_ the
> >slide. Normal flatbeds can only shine light _at_ reflective
> >surfaces. Some scanners do come with such an attachment - the Epson
> >Photo for instance, whereas others charge hundreds of pounds extra.
> >
>
> Has anyone tried to project a slide onto a flatbed scanner with the
> scanner's interior light source disabled during the scan? There are a lot
> of issues like focus, light projection intensity; but it might make for an
> interesting student lab project.
>
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