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Rare Book School courses in March 2002



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[Cross-posted. Please excuse any duplication.]

RARE BOOK SCHOOL is pleased to announce its 2002 Sessions, a collection of
five-day, non-credit courses on topics concerning rare books, manuscripts,
the history of books and printing, and special collections to be held at
the University of Virginia.

FOR AN APPLICATION FORM and electronic copies of the complete brochure and
Rare Book School expanded course descriptions, providing additional details
about the courses offered and other information about Rare Book School,
visit our Web site at

                 http://www.rarebookschool.org

Subscribers to the list may find the following Rare Book School courses to
be of particular interest:

22. THE PRINTED BOOK IN THE WEST SINCE 1800  (MONDAY-FRIDAY, MARCH 11-15).
The history of the printed book in the West since 1800 is characterized on
the one hand by the ever-accelerating pace of technological change, and on
the other by organized aesthetic and conceptual resistance to that
revolution. This course will survey the technological advances in
papermaking, illustration processes, composition, printing, binding, and
distribution which fueled the development of the modern book industry. It
will also give an overview of those phenomena -- the William Morris and the
modern fine press movement, artists' books, the rise of book-clubs and
organized bibliophily -- which have arisen to oppose this
industrialization. This course, the third in the new RBS sequence of
history of the book courses beginning with The Book in the Manuscript Era
(H-020) and continuing with The Printed Book in the West to 1800 (H - 030),
will be offered for the first time in 2002. Instructor: Eric Holzenberg.

ERIC HOLZENBERG is Director and Librarian of the Grolier Club in New York
City. He is the author of The Middle Hill Press (1997).


21. THE PRINTED BOOK IN THE WEST TO 1800  (MONDAY-FRIDAY, MARCH 11-15).
The introduction and spread of printing in Europe; the development of book
design and illustration; the rise of the publishing industry; freedom and
the regulation of the press; the increase in literacy and its social
consequences; the traffic in printed matter and the growth of personal and
institutional collections; the impact of the Industrial Revolution.
Intended for those who have a limited background -- but a considerable
interest -- in the history of the book, and who expect, sooner or later, to
take the other two courses in this sequence, The Book in the Manuscript Era
(H-020) and The Printed Book in the West since 1800 (H-040). Instructor:
Martin Antonetti.

MARTIN ATONETTI became Curator of Rare Books at Smith College in 1997,
before which he was Librarian of the Grolier Club.



Rare Book School                        Phone: 434/924-8851
114 Alderman Library            Fax: 434/924-8824
University of Virginia          Email: oldbooks@virginia.edu
Charlottesville, VA  22903              http://www.rarebookschool.org

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