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Re: Digital Domesday Book lasts 15 years not 1000



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          CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
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Perhaps a little bit off topic, but here's an interesting site with
longevity and future usability in mind.

http://www.longnow.org/10klibrary/library.htm


----- Original Message -----
From: "AJ" <austin@PRINTSBYAJ.COM>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 11:33 AM
Subject: Digital Domesday Book lasts 15 years not 1000


>              ***********************************************
>           CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
>            See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>              ***********************************************
>
> I feel a need to chime in here with a couple observations.
>
> First, the general observation of "new fangled" being shunned by current
> craftsmen is correct whether we are talking printing or audio
reproduction.
> There are those who seek out vacuum tube equipment to reproduce audio
> tracks. I am not saying they are or are not correct. It is the same with
all
> technologies.
>
> Second, rather than making blanket statements about new and old, I think
> that the standards set by current technology must be used to determine the
> viability of new techniques. We tend to get comfortable with a process and
> don't want anything to mess up our way of doing things. It is this comfort
> level that tends to prolong the life of many obsolete processes. An open
> mind is required to maintain a craft.
>
> The standards set by printers using time proven techniques should be the
> determining factor in choosing a process from the many "new fangled"
options
> available. The longevity of a finished product is the first standard which
> has been shoved into the background as to importance. It is believed that
> getting it on the shelves now is more important than doing it in a way
which
> will make it last. It was the standard of "doing it right" which was the
> mark which Gutenberg had to aspire to with his idea of using movable type
as
> opposed to doing it with pen and ink. Today there are copies of both in
> existence. Documents written in pen and ink from the 15th century as well
as
> books and documents printed using movable type from the same time period.
I
> would have a hard time believing that much of the material printed today
> will be around for historians in the 25th century.
>
>  I certainly do not suggest that everything done the "old fashioned way"
is
> perfect. There have been experiments with processes which have proven to
be
> a mistake along the way. Take the disaster we have on our hands with the
> early wood pulp books of the late 1800's. Perhaps this problem points up
the
> main issue of this discussion. While a market was created for inexpensive,
> mass produced books, there was at the same time a much larger market for
> more long lasting products. I feel it is the same today. There is a market
> for a disposable product. Perhaps a standard will develop over time for
> these products. As of now the idea is more of a confusion than anything.
> Technology has made it so easy to put our message on paper that it is
> difficult to get anyone to appreciate the effort required to do a quality
> job. How can we expect the public to take notice when they are drowning in
> paper?
>
> prints by AJ
> Austin Jones
> Point Pleasant, WV  USA
>
> Dean Fletcher Wrote in part -
>
> I'm sure that when book printing technology was first introduced that the
> guild of scribes came up with much the same reasoning that hand-written
> books
> were "far superior"  and more durable than thiese new fangled printed
books.
> After all, any new technology becomes obsolete, but, there will always be
> scribes, right?
>
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