[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [BKARTS] advise on letterpresses...



             ***********************************************
          CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
           See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

find a place (school, museum or individual) where you can learn the basics
of letterpress printing and THEN think about buying a press.  That will help
you determine what you want.

And, the color of the handle is immaterial!  And yes, having the roller
cores will facilitate obtaining new rollers.




-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of sheri cifaldi
Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2002 9:05 AM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Subject: [BKARTS] advise on letterpresses...


             ***********************************************
          CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
           See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

Okay, so I have an opportunity to purchase my very first letterpress (only 1
month after buying my very first batch of metal type)... I have only a vague
idea
on how to work one & even less on the actual equipment.

These are my choices. Can anyone give me some advise?

1. Acme Machine Company; Pilot Press (says it's from Bombay on the press).
It is
red. I believe the roller should be 8" (It's missing- how easy would it be
to
find a replacement?)

2. Tabletop Pilot press (made in India). It's blue & has an orange handle on
the
left hand side. I believe the roller for this one should be 8.75" (Again,
it's
missing- how easy would it be to find a replacement?)

3. Larger, more sturdy table top press... more expensive. I was told this
would
be my best best (I think it's American or English made). It is a complete
press,
but the rollers would need to be replaced (but the rollers are still on the
spindles - is that the correct term?). I was told it is easier to replace
the
rollers if the inner metal type is still there. Is this true?

4. A flat proofing press. It's a little larger than 11x17. I was told you
would
secure the type with magnets or a metal frame, then ink the type with a
hand-held
brayer, but your paper down & then run the roller over the paper.

Any thoughts would be much appreciated as I am new to the wonderful world of
letterpresses!

Thanks,
sheri

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]