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Re: [BKARTS] advise on letterpresses...



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          CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
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Sheri:

You can get a lot of advice and parts (including rollers, etc.) from NA
Graphics in Silverton, Colorado. They can tell you how much it will cost you
to refurbish the various presses you have at your disposal. Because old
presses are often missing very important parts, that cost can sometimes be
prohibitive, so it's good to know in advance.

Here is contact information:

Fritz Klinke, NA Graphics
1314 Greene Street, P.O. Box 467
Silverton, Colorado 81433 USA
970-387-0212, fax 970-387-0127
nagraph@frontier.net


Katie Harper
Ars Brevis Press
Cincinnati, OH
513-233-9588




> From: sheri cifaldi <sheri@SECTOR13.ORG>
> Reply-To: "Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com"
> <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
> Date: Tue, 14 May 2002 10:04:58 -0400
> To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
> Subject: advise on letterpresses...
>
> ***********************************************
> CENTRAL NEW YORK BOOK ARTS: TRADITIONAL TO INNOVATIVE
> See The Exhibition Online, And Order Your Catalog.
> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> ***********************************************
>
> Okay, so I have an opportunity to purchase my very first letterpress (only 1
> month after buying my very first batch of metal type)... I have only a vague
> idea
> on how to work one & even less on the actual equipment.
>
> These are my choices. Can anyone give me some advise?
>
> 1. Acme Machine Company; Pilot Press (says it's from Bombay on the press). It
> is
> red. I believe the roller should be 8" (It's missing- how easy would it be to
> find a replacement?)
>
> 2. Tabletop Pilot press (made in India). It's blue & has an orange handle on
> the
> left hand side. I believe the roller for this one should be 8.75" (Again, it's
> missing- how easy would it be to find a replacement?)
>
> 3. Larger, more sturdy table top press... more expensive. I was told this
> would
> be my best best (I think it's American or English made). It is a complete
> press,
> but the rollers would need to be replaced (but the rollers are still on the
> spindles - is that the correct term?). I was told it is easier to replace the
> rollers if the inner metal type is still there. Is this true?
>
> 4. A flat proofing press. It's a little larger than 11x17. I was told you
> would
> secure the type with magnets or a metal frame, then ink the type with a
> hand-held
> brayer, but your paper down & then run the roller over the paper.
>
> Any thoughts would be much appreciated as I am new to the wonderful world of
> letterpresses!
>
> Thanks,
> sheri
>
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> BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


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