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Re: [BKARTS] Translation



Dear Mr. Drake,
There's a great page for those interested in Spinoza's writings
(http://home.planetinternet.be/~pin86315/spinoza) which will allow you to
see the whole context of your quotation--
" For the eyes of the mind, whereby it sees and observes things, are none
other than proofs."  [Mentis oculi, quibus res videt observatque, sunt ipsae
demonstrationes]

I pasted the latin text followed by an English translation below.  Both are
from the webpage above.

with best wishes
Holly Huffman



SPINOZA


E†T†H†I†C†E†S

P†A†R†S† †Q†U†I†N†T†A

DE POTENTIA INTELLECTUS
SEU DE LIBERTATE HUMANA.



PROPOSITIO XXIII. Mens humana non potest cum corpore absolute destrui, sed
eius aliquid remanet quod aeternum est.

DEMONSTRATIO. In Deo datur necessario conceptus seu idea, quae corporis
humani essentiam exprimit (per prop. praeced.), quae propterea aliquid
necessario est, quod ad essentiam mentis humanae pertinet (per prop. 13. P.
2.). Sed menti humanae nullam durationem, quae tempore definiri potest,
tribuimus, nisi quatenus corporis actualem existentiam, quae per durationem
explicatur et tempore definiri potest, exprimit, hoc est (per coroll. prop.
8. P. 2.) ipsi durationem non tribuimus nisi durante corpore. Cum tamen
aliquid nihilominus sit id, quod aeterna quadam necessitate per ipsam Dei
essentiam concipitur (per prop. praeced.), erit necessario hoc aliquid, quod
ad mentis essentiam pertinet, aeternum. Q.E.D.


SCHOLIUM. Est, uti diximus, haec idea, quae corporis essentiam sub specie
aeternitatis exprimit, certus cogitandi modus, qui ad mentis essentiam
pertinet, quique necessario aeternus est. Nec tamen fieri potest, ut
recordemur nos ante corpus exstitisse, quandoquidem nec in corpore ulla eius
vestigia dari, nec aeternitas tempore definiri, nec ullam ad tempus
relationem habere potest. At nihilominus sentimus experimurque, nos aeternos
esse. Nam mens non minus res illas sentit , quas intelligendo concipit, quam
quas in memoria habet. Mentis enim oculi, quibus res videt observatque, sunt
ipsae demonstrationes. Quamvis itaque non recordemur nos ante corpus
exstitisse, sentimus tamen mentem nostram, quatenus corporis essentiam sub
aeternitatis specie involvit, aeternam esse, et hanc eius existentiam
tempore definiri sive per durationem explicari non posse. Mens igitur nostra
eatenus tantum potest dici durare, eiusque existentia certo tempore definiri
potest, quatenus actualem corporis existentiam involvit, et eatenus tantum
potentiam habet rerum existentiam tempore determinandi, easque sub duratione
concipiendi.


TRANSLATION:
PROP. XXIII. The human mind cannot be absolutely destroyed with the body,
but there remains of it something which is eternal.


Proof.--There is necessarily in God a concept or idea, which expresses the
essence of the human body (last Prop.), which, therefore, is necessarily
something appertaining to the essence of the human mind (II. xiii.). But we
have not assigned to the human mind any, duration, definable by time, except
in so far as it expresses the actual existence of the body, which is
explained through duration, and may be defined by timečthat is (II. viii.
Coroll.), we do not assign to it duration, except while the body endures.
Yet, as there is something, notwithstanding, which is conceived by a certain
eternal necessity through the very essence of God (last Prop.); this
something, which appertains to the essence of the mind, will necessarily be
eternal.††Q.E.D.



Note.--This idea, which expresses the essence of the body under the form of
eternity, is, as we have said, a certain mode of thinking, which belongs to
the essence of the mind, and is necessarily eternal. Yet it is not possible
that we should remember that we existed before our body, for our body can
bear no trace of such existence, neither can eternity be defined in terms of
time, or have any relation to time. But, notwithstanding, we feel and know
that we are eternal. For the mind feels those things that it conceives by
understanding, no less than those things that it remembers. For the eyes of
the mind, whereby it sees and observes things, are none other than proofs.
Thus, although we do not remember that we existed before the body, yet we
feel that our mind, in so far as it involves the essence of the body, under
the form of eternity, is eternal, and that thus its existence cannot be
defined in terms of time, or explained through duration. Thus our mind can
only be said to endure, and its existence can only be defined by a fixed
time, in so far as it involves the actual existence of the body. Thus far
only has it the power of determining the existence of things by time, and
conceiving them under the category of duration.

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