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[BKARTS] Double-fan binding + test results



Speaking of tests, does anybody have results from any set of systematic
tests comparing different methods/glues/papers/any other factor for (hand)
binding? Ben, you mentioned you did some experimentation, do you have a
writeup anywhere you wouldn't mind sharing with us?

Regards,

Waqar

At Thursday 11/7/2002 01:47 PM, you wrote:
>Double fan adhesive binding was tested by the Library Binding Institute.
>The tests confirmed that notching does add strength to the binding.
>
>Currently, our firm produces thousands of books a day using this method of
>binding.  All are notched.
>
>Bruce F. Jacobsen
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Ben Wiens [mailto:ben@BENWIENS.COM]
>Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2002 1:33 PM
>To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>Subject: [BKARTS] Double-fan binding perfect bound books
>
>Hi Waqar:
>
>DOUBLE-FAN BINDING DOES NOT REQUIRE NOTCHING
>Duncan is right that some binderies do use notches when double-fan binding.
>In my opinion notching is not necessary with double-fan gluing. It appears
>that most people doing hand bookbinding using simple double-fan jigs do not
>use notching. I would guess that most high volume production double-fan
>bindings do not use notching either. I have opened many such books and there
>are no notches visible. Yes I see very slight notching in lay-flat
>polyurethane bound books, but these are not double-fan glued.
>
>WHY NOTCH?
>The double-fan binding already has up to 2 x the strength of normal perfect
>binding using hot melts and up to 2x  the strength of a sewn binding when
>using non coated paper. Notching 1/4 to 3/8 inches deep seriously reduces
>the flexibility of the binding. It is possible to increase the depth of the
>glue line and thereby the strength in double-fan gluing by rather increasing
>the fan angle. It could be increased to 180 degrees if necessary. This is a
>way of increasing the strength even more on thick volumes without reducing
>the flexibility as much. At least these are my conclusions after
>considerable experimentation, pull tests, and bending tests.
>
>NOTCHING IN NORMAL PERFECT BINDING
>Modern perfect binding is even going away from deep notching. Older books
>were bound using hot melt adhesives which harden very quickly. Many high
>speed perfect binding lines use polyurethane adhesive which hardens slower.
>Polyurethane adhesive is also much stronger than the regular hot melt
>adhesives. It appears that some roughening and slight notching is still used
>here. Break open an old perfect bound book and you will see deep notches,
>while on polyurethane bound books the notches seem much shallower. The
>notches are quite visible in a RepKover polyurethane bound book even though
>they are very shallow. The notch depth seems to be only about 0.010 inches
>or 0.25 mm maximum.
>
>FANNING AND NOTCHING
>Double-fanning was invented as a scientific advancement over notching. It
>makes sense to slightly tip or glue the sides of the pages together at the
>binding end instead of making deep grooves in the paper every quarter inch
>or so. Notching hardly increases the area of the glue line. Putting adhesive
>on each side dramatically increases the glue area. Anyone with different
>conclusions based on facts is welcome to state their case.
>
>Ben Wiens...applied energy scientist
>Ben Wiens Energy Science Inc.
>8-1200 Brunette Ave. Coquitlam BC V3K1G3 Canada
>E-mail: ben@benwiens.com
>Energy Website: http://www.benwiens.com
>Read my popular web-booklet "The Future of Fuel Cells"
>
>-----Original Message-----
>         From a mechanized point of view, the perfect binding machine
>has a milling station that puts small crosshatch marks on the spine
>as the text block travels past.  Fan binding machines usually have
>deeper notching to allow for further penetration of the adhesives.
>Some of the notching systems will go as deep as 1/4 to 3/8 of an
>inch.  The milling stations on a perfect binder usually cut no deeper
>than one or two millimeters.
>
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>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
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