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Re: [BKARTS] Cutoffs...and Industrial Design



FYI
Garry

Publisher description for Cradle to cradle : remaking the way we make things
/ William McDonough & Michael Braungart.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
 A manifesto for a radically different philosophy and practice of
manufacture and environmentalism

"Reduce, reuse, recycle" urge environmentalists in other words, do more with
less in order to minimize damage. As William McDonough and Michael Braungart
argue in their provocative, visionary book, however, this approach
perpetuates a one-way, "cradle to grave" manufacturing model that dates to
the Industrial Revolution and casts off as much as 90 percent of the
materials it uses as waste, much of it toxic. Why not challenge the notion
that human industry must inevitably damage the natural world, they ask.


In fact, why not take nature itself as our model? A tree produces thousands
of blossoms in order to create another tree, yet we do not consider its
abundance wasteful but safe, beautiful, and highly effective hence, "waste
equals food" is the first principle the book sets forth. Products might be
designed so that, after their useful life, they provide nourishment for
something new-either as "biological nutrients" that safely re-enter the
environment or as "technical nutrients" that circulate within closed-loop
industrial cycles, without being "downcycled" into low-grade uses (as most
"recyclables" now are).


Elaborating their principles from experience (re)designing everything from
carpeting to corporate campuses, the authors make an exciting and viable
case for change.





-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Lani Labay
Sent: November 7, 2002 7:50 PM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Cutoffs...and Industrial Design


I have taken secret pleasure in reading Ben's posts, as I continue to
reconcile my commercial publishing background with my love of the book as
object and artwork. I have stopped torturing myself with specific questions,
because I realize that the world of book arts is so diverse that trying to
figure it out just gets in the way of the ideas that inspire me. But it
really is exciting to see so many different approaches to making books, and
I have only recently considered industrial design as one of them.

Has anyone ever read the book _Cradle to Cradle_? It was written by an
architect and a chemist (sorry, I don't have their names handy) and
reconsiders the way objects are designed from the top down, so that instead
of making waste, we are only left with more materials for making products.
And get this -- the entire book is printed in plastic, which the authors
claim is not only waterproof, but could be easily converted into another
product with minimal energy. (Or something to that effect -- I didn't get to
finish reading the book before it was stolen, but I loved the vellum-like
tactile and printed quality of the pages, even though it felt more like a
brick than a book.)

I believe the book was published in the past year. I wonder if its theories,
or similar ones, have sparked any discussion in the book arts/publishing
community...?

Lani Labay


-----Original Message-----
From: Ben Wiens <ben@BENWIENS.COM>
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
Date: Wednesday, November 06, 2002 2:06 PM
Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Cutoffs


>It seems a shame to throw scraps away. If an immediate and easy end user
>cannot be found, it sometimes is the most efficient thing to do, even when
>the scraps are high quality. Part of my business has to do with
>conservation, mostly with energy, but I have looked into other forms of
>conservation as well. If we look at some of the statistics we find:
>
>   1. About 40% of all books that are printed are never even sold and the
>books scrapped due to low sales. Because many of these books are scrapped
by
>the book stores, not all will even find their way into a recycling bin.
>   2. Print-On-Demand is getting more popular now which it seems should
>reduce the paper waste mentioned above. Not necessarily. Many of these
books
>are printed in 8.5 x 11 inch format and then because people think that such
>a book size looks amateur, the books are trimmed to 6 x 9 or 7 x 10 inches.
>Think of the paper scraps developed with this process when millions of
books
>are printed.
>   3. A huge amount of books like software books are hardly even read
before
>they are replaced with newer versions.
>   4. Newspapers are read for a few minutes and then thrown away.
>   5. We all get a large amount of flyers in the mail on a steady basis.
>   6. It will use up a large amount of non renewable fossil fuel to deliver
>small scraps of paper to various places.
>
>We can save the most paper by looking at the big picture first and trying
to
>do something about that. Does that sound like I'm preaching.
>
>Ben Wiens...applied energy scientist
>Ben Wiens Energy Science Inc.
>8-1200 Brunette Ave. Coquitlam BC V3K1G3 Canada
>E-mail: ben@benwiens.com
>Energy Website: http://www.benwiens.com
>Read my popular web-booklet "Energy Science Made Simple"
>
>-----Original Message-----
>First, let me warn you that you are treading down dangerous ground.  If you
>can't throw away scraps, your bindery will become nothing but scraps with
no
>place to work.  I know, I've been there...
>
>-----Original Message-----
>I recently finished trimming a 450+ page book in preparation for binding
and
>ended up with hundreds of pieces of Mohawk Superfine with the dimensions of
>60mm X 235 mm. As I only need a couple of bookmarks, does anyone have any
>suggestions as to what these small pieces could be used for? It seems a
>shame to throw them away. Thanks.
>
>             ***********************************************
>            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
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