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Re: [BKARTS] Designing poetry books-



Hi Katie:

It's hard to track down all the books mentioned on this listserver. I'm sure the information can be valuable, but how many books do you have to track down, order, and wait to get till you find a single passage that clicks with your thinking. Hardly any are in my local libraries. It would be nice to have a decent abstract or Table of Contents listed otherwise it is often just a game of chance. I've read a lot of books on book layout and after awhile one realizes that book design is like clothing fashions, they change with time, with function, and each designer has a different view. A current design is popular till it is proved old by someone else. Here are some things I gleaned:

   1. Linda Mullin, Illustrator * Author * Publisher, MULLIN ART PUBLISHING, West Vancouver, BC Canada lurks on this listserver. She designed and illustrated a very nice "popular" type poetry book recently. I met her at an antiquarian book show in Vancouver Canada and visited her this last year. She is largely an illustrator. The book is printed in color by Friesen Printers in Manitoba Canada in an inexpensive perfect binding but sports a French folded inwards cover to make it a little special. I can't remember the title though. What makes the book special is the illustrations. 

   2. I think a poetry book needs illustrations.

   3. The primary thing behind white space is that endless text is boring to people. A normal amount of white space between lines of text and margins looks balanced, and this depends of the text. Poetry books have much more white space than novels because of the variable line lengths. 

   4. White space beyond what is normally required is a waste of paper. It is used as a cheap alternative to having illustrations.  

   5. Illustrations provide symbols to help the mind identify each poem.

   6. Illustrations could even be clipart. The very popular book "What Color Is Your Parachute" appears to use old non copyright engravings. I am guessing here.

   7. Even simple graphic symbols and shading help to make each poem look different.

   8. Poetry is not as popular as it used to be and so innovative methods have to be found to increase it's readability and popularity.

   9. Be bold and use new techniques to make your book stand out.

   10. Think about using a non serif font like Arial or Helvetica. Apparently such fonts are the standard in Europe. New research indicates that it is actually easier to read than serif fonts, even thought North American hearsay says that serif fonts are easier to read. A non serif font like Tahoma actually has about 30% greater font area than the same size in Times and takes up marginally more page area.

Ben Wiens...applied energy scientist
Ben Wiens Energy Science Inc.
8-1200 Brunette Ave. Coquitlam BC V3K1G3 Canada 
E-mail: ben@benwiens.com
Energy Website: http://www.benwiens.com
Read my popular web-booklet "Energy Science Made Simple"

-----Original Message-----
The only reference I can find to any type of book on the printing and
typesetting of Poetry is Clifford Burke's, mentioned below. It is available
used, but is, unfortunately, out of my price range, and none of my local
libraries has it.

Barring a "how to" text, can any suggest books of poetry that are
particularly excellent in terms of their design or layout, printing,
binding, etc.?


Katie Harper
Ars Brevis Press
Cincinnati, OH
513-233-9588
http://www.arsbrevispress.com





> From: Kyle Schlesinger <ks46@ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU>
> Reply-To: "Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com"
> <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 16:13:54 -0500
> To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
> Subject: Re: Designing poetry books
>
> Dear Katie & Michael
>
> I'm interested in this question also, and as far as I know Clifford Burke
> is the only printer/author who has written a full length study on the
> subject.  The book is called (conveniently) Printing Poetry : A Workbook in
> Typographic Reification and it was published in San Francisco at the Scarab
> Press in 1980.  Of course there are a lot of essays on the subject, some
> written by printers printing their own writing such as Bill Everson or
> Walter Hamady, but I think there is a marked difference between printing
> one's own writing and the active service of the printer/editor/designer.
>
> Best Wishes,
>
> Kyle
>
> --On Monday, December 09, 2002, 3:53 P M -0500 Michael Brad y
> <jbrady@EMAIL.UNC.EDU> wrote:
>
>> Katie
>>
>>> All this talk about book design brings up another point: are there any
>>> resources around devoted to the type setting and layout/design of poetry?
>>
>> I don't know specifically, but I have worked with Joke Kachergis, an
>> award-winning designer of university books, poetry books, and others.
>>
>> I recommend you contact Anne Thielgard at Kachergis Book Design. The URL
>> is:
>>
>> http://www.kachergisbookdesign.com/
>>
>>
>> --
>> Michael Brad y
>> http://www.unc.edu/~jbrady/index.html
>>
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            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
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