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Re: [BKARTS] Degrees and Bushwacking



Ed:

Thanks for your note and for its temperate tone.
Though your posting was one of several to which I was
responding, I hope that my comments were understood as
impersonal and general. Everyone’s personal situation
is different, and I understand that for some there are
options that are not available to others. I, too, was
unable to take advantage of opportunities that other
people had in life. But my philosophy has always been
to take the hand that is dealt me and play it as well
as possible. My challenge to binders and conservators
who hope to have academic jobs in the future was to
plan your training and education carefully – those of
us who are long past the training years have to make
do with what we got way back when.

 I was glad to see comments by others that confirmed
both my speculation and my unstated hunch: I assumed
that ‘formal training’ in the job announcement was a
coded way of including many people who did not have an
academic ‘degree’ and yet were perfectly well
qualified through their technical skill and
experience.

The University of Delaware might be especially
restrictive in this regard, but other colleges are
not. Many have positions such as ‘artist in residence’
that welcome people without formal academic
qualifications or expectations, on the strength of
their abilities alone. It might also be useful to
consider that Mozart and Michaelangelo didn’t get
college educations at times when almost no one got
college educations, especially artists and musicians.
Since the Second World War most people do get college
educations, and in 2002 75% of Americans get at least
some college – so it’s hard to imagine a young Mozart
not being picked up in 1960 or 1970 by a prominent
conservatory. Of course, I’m no Mozart or
Michaelangelo, but anyone who possesses that level of
genius perhaps has a legitimate right to complain if
no college will hire them!

Ed, are you the guy who sells the leather scraps on
Ebay? I’ve always hesitated to buy good quality
leather that way – I prefer to see and feel the
leather I buy – but I have to say that I was intrigued
by the note that the scrap leather came from bindings
for that actor.

Best regards,

Don





--- Edward Stansell <CraftBook@AOL.COM> wrote:
> Don,
>
> I'll keep this short.  When I learned bookbinding
> and even later when I
> learned book restoration, There were no formal
> institutions where one could
> learn these things. What's more; considering my age
> and the lack of free time
> to attend a course in a subject I could teach,
> getting a degree is a bit
> impractical.
>
> Ed
>
>
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             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
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