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Re: [BKARTS] Info Dry Spell



1958, I wasn't born in 1938.

MayKitten
--- Silver MayKitten <maykitten1@YAHOO.COM> wrote:
> What I use is a Roseback rotery board cutter, that I bought
> new in 1938. It takes some setup, is slow, but is great for
> cutting 50 book covers or more.
>
> MayKitten
> --- Edward Stansell <CraftBook@AOL.COM> wrote:
> > Kathleen,
> >
> > I use a guillotine type paper cutter. If I didn't, my next
> choice
> > would be a
> > Jaques board shear. If I had floor space, I'd have both.  In
> your
> > case I
> > would use a utility knife and a square. Be careful. It's easy
> to
> > loose a
> > finger. They work rather well, if you use them properly. Make
> > sure that you
> > keep your finger out of the way and run the knife along your
> > square or rule
> > with medium pressure. Make several passes. If you use too much
> > pressure the
> > knife may jump the rule and lop off a digit. At best it louses
> up
> > the cut. If
> > you have a friend with a paper cutter or board shear, take
> > advantage of that.
> > Printers don't like to cut boards because the dull the knife
> > almost
> > immediately. Oftentimes they nick the blade. A printer  may do
> it
> > for you if
> > their knife is already dull and it's time to change it. When I
> > was in the
> > supply business, I sold boards cut to size. Even for one book,
> > for the very
> > reason that everyone can't buy a board shear or paper cutter.
> > However, that's
> > in the past. Ask your supplier to sell you cut boards. Of
> course
> > you'll pay a
> > cutting charge. If you are buying 500 lbs or more, they can be
> > rotary-cut at
> > the mill.
> >
> > Your corners will be better if you don't leave too much
> material
> > in them. The
> > rule of thumb (until you can judge by eyesight) is to bring the
> > cloth up
> > across the edge of the board at the corner and leaving only a
> > hair bredth
> > above that, cut your material at that point. That way, you have
> > almost no
> > excess and a good square corner.
> >
> > Since you are a relative novice, I would recommend acrylic
> > impregnated cloth
> > as opposed to starch filled. It is much more forgiving, should
> > you get a
> > gluey finger mark on it. You can't get starch filled cloth wet
> > without
> > marring the finish. Acrylic cloth also doesn't curl as fast
> when
> > you put
> > paste or glue directly on the cloth.
> >
> > Regards,
> > Ed
> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> >       For subscription information, the Archive, and other
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> >             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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>
>
> =====
> Pagan, Pagan, what are you finding?
> Yours is the road that winds lonely and far,
> Strange are the shadows that round you come creeping,
> Still through the clouds is the glint of a star!
>
> From the book, Charge of the Goddess
> BY: Doreen Valiente
>
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>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other
> related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************


=====
Pagan, Pagan, what are you finding?
Yours is the road that winds lonely and far,
Strange are the shadows that round you come creeping,
Still through the clouds is the glint of a star!

From the book, Charge of the Goddess
BY: Doreen Valiente

__________________________________________________
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Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
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             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


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