[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [BKARTS] Book cloth in Seattle



Talas has an amazing selection of bookcloth and offer swatch samples for
a reasonable cost.  I personally like the Asahi cloth, however they are
more expensive. You can access their catalogue online at
http://www.talasonline.com/

Carol Pratt wrote:

> Indeed, the silk finishes are not to everyone's taste, nor are they
> appropriate for all covers.   However, I have found the Japanese cloths
> to be quite strong enough.  I've made samples with several for my own
> daily use, and these have held up very, very well, better in some ways
> than 100% cottons I have tried.  Moreover, there are other finishes than
> "silk" available.
>
> I also like linen blend bookcloths , and Colophon has carried a very
> nice one in several colors.  The conservation buckrams now carried by
> Library Binding Supply are attractive, too, more subdued and currently
> available in a limited range of colors.  However, LBS has a larger
> minimum order  (5 yds) than do other vendors, which may be a problem for
> small hand binders.
>
> The question we were discussing had to do with finding cloths "close to
> home" that could be examined. I rely on sample sets for examination
> purposes, because locally the bookcloth supply is pretty limited and
> expensive, and the pieces are small.  To have the retailer order
> something would not be cost effective, given their markup.  Colophon and
> Hiromi are much closer to central Washington (all in zone 1) for
> shipping, than are Massachusetts, New York, and Maryland (all in zone
> 8), and relative costs plus shipping time are important, after all.
>
> Carol
> Eugene, OR
> --------------
>
> On Monday, December 30, 2002, at 05:44 AM, Edward Stansell wrote:
>
>> I mean no disparagement to anyone's taste by this question, but what is
>> the
>> attraction to Japanese bookcloth?  I'll admit that some are quite
>> handsome.
>> However does every book need a silk finish?
>>
>> Japanese bookcloth and just about all paperbacked cloth is exceedingly
>> weak.
>> Witness the need for a paperback. Their surface is easily abraded and
>> cannot
>> be cleaned without damage. A cover material should not only survive the
>> binding process, but also everyday use by its eventual owner. If the
>> fabric
>> were more substantial I would find it more desirable.
>>
>> Ed
>
>
>             ***********************************************
>            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>             ***********************************************
>

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]