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Re: [BKARTS] Fwd: use of scroll in science education



Hello!
I've taught this to science (and other content-area) teachers & to kids:
the scroll is an ingenious solution when you look at the materials the
first book makers had to work with: papyrus. Because you make papyrus paper
by laying the slices vertically & then horizontally, there is no way you
can fold this paper without damaging the fibers (imagine a dried reed).
Piercing it is also a tricky business, though it was made into codices
transitionally. Proficiency standards in my state (Ohio) require science
teachers to teach about the technological innovations of other cultures;
having their students make papyrus gives them a way to give a hands-on
break to all the teaching to the test they must do.

People started to experiment with other book forms when they had paper that
could be folded without damage (long fibered Asian paper), discovered in
part because not everyone could grow papyrus (Egypt mainly) and in part it
was annoying to actually use: imagine reading the Iliad on 24 mammoth
pages.  If you wanted to find a fact or passage in the middle of a scroll,
you were looking a while.

The scroll traveled along the silk road into China and morphed into some
other really cool transitional (and lasting) forms. You can find out more
about it at The British Library's site, the International Dunhuang Project
{ http://idp.bl.uk/}. I'd also highly recommend Life Along the Silk Road by
Susan Whitfield, recreating what life was like using original source
documents found in caves that were a monastary/way station/library/
pilgrimage site.

Sorry if this is more than you were looking for, it's just  so fascinating
to me...
Val Van Sice


Jessica Levine wrote:

> can you elaborate on your thoughts, particularly your cautions?
> i look forward to the dialogue.
> jessica
>
> BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU writes:
> >Making scrolls in cross curricular education venues,
> >especially science, I would forewarn you to indulge
> >the students with explorations and discussions
> >regarding the reasons scrolls are all but extinct in
> >current popular book formats... including microfiche.
> >The weaknesses (and strengths) of the book structure
> >are grounds for a great deal of consternation among
> >traditional learners. That said, the creative
> >challenges this creates is an amazingly powerful
> >springboard for students to lead their readers through
> >the many scientific process(es) s/he is investigating.
> >
> >The scroll can have various "page" widths and
> >heights....
> >
> >
> >jessica_levine@ANTIOCHSEA.EDU> wrote:
> >> hello folks.
> >> i'm doing an investigation for a masters project on
> >> the use of the scroll
> >> (or concertina/orihon) in science education
> >> classrooms as a tool for
> >> continual observation journal.
> >> i see the scroll as a metaphor for the natural and
> >> continuous growth or
> >> phases of natural phenomena.
> >> here are a few of my assumptions: i believe that
> >> > the kinesethics of making a scroll enhances
> >> conceptual understanding
> >> ,
> >> > the scroll unfolds the story
> >> ,
> >> >. the scroll illustrates continuity; a path
> >> ,
> >> > in a scroll, it's all there at the same time
> >> ,
> >> > when you have pages, life (or what you are
> >> "studying") gets segmented.
> >> .
> >> >. therefore, the scroll is a natural metaphor for
> >> integration and vehicle
> >>  f
> >> >or education as a path, not a destination.
> >>
> >> i'm curious to know what is being done with scrolls
> >> in classrooms.
> >> and more specifically what are people's thoughts on
> >> the use of the scroll
> >> (particularly this medium) for developing meaning
> >> and understanding in
> >> scientific observation.
> >>
> >> looking forward to response.
> >>
> >> jessica
> >>
> >>
> >> jessica levine
> >> masters candidate
> >> antioch university
> >> seattle, wa
> >>
> >>
> >> ***********************************************
> >>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the
> >> book arts.
> >>       For subscription information, the Archive, and
> >> other related
> >>             resources and links go to the
> >> Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> >>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >>
> >>         Archive maintained and suppported by
> >> Conservation OnLine
> >>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
> >>
>
> "the most important thing is not to stop questioning." --albert einstein
>
> jessica levine
> antioch university
> seattle, wa
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


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