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[BKARTS] Japanese punch drill (2)



I am curious to know whether you like your Japanese Punch Drill. In
having gone through the threads on the archive, I cannot tell whether
people have had positive experiences with them or not.

Best,
Heidi

There are 23 messages totalling 1090 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Hemp Cord (6)
  2. Asian style hand scrolls (3)
  3. The_Pennies? (2)
  4. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Photos=20of=2016th-18th=20c.=A0=20Hand=20Book=20P?=
     =?ISO-8859-1?Q?resses?=
  5. AW: Travelling to Munich
  6. Wooden common presses?
  7. <No subject given> (3)
  8. drying books (2)
  9. bookfilter
 10. Japanese punch drill (2)
 11. Freshest Advices: March 2003

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 24 Mar 2003 22:18:54 -0800
From:    "Jack C. Thompson" <tcl@TELEPORT.COM>
Subject: Re: Hemp Cord

As always, it all depends....

If a flitch of flax (couldn't help m'self), were to be tested alongside
a hank-O-hemp, all retted the same, then the hemp would likely come out
ahead of the game.

Look to Naval Stores.  When compared in equal tests, at sea, rope made
from hemp did better that rope made from flax/linen.

However, linen or hemp, sewing supports are not much exposed to storms at
sea (with any luck) so that doesn't really matter.

On the other hand, if your hemp cord came from Chinese enzyme retted fiber,
it will not be as strong as, for instance, Russian grass retted fiber.

But, Russian grass retted fiber is not as good as, for instance, Belgian,
Italian, or Irish retted flax fiber.

Of course, the Irish don't ret their fiber anymore.  They buy from the
Belgians and Italians, when they don't buy from the Russians, or Chinese
(or any number of the new Central European countries.)

"What was your question?  You in the back..."

Ah, yes.  Well, that is why I grow, ret, hackle, scutch, and spin my own
thread and cord from flax when it is important enough.  They would put me
in jail if I grew hemp.

Cheers,

Jack



Does anyone on this list know how hemp cord compares to linen cord to
sew on? I've been given a sample of hemp cord. It seems very strong,
frays out very nicely, and claims to be 100% natural. I have no idea
though about its long term use. Any input would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Frank Lehmann
Lehmann Bindery

Thompson Conservation Lab.
7549 N. Fenwick
Portland, Oregon  97217
USA

503/735-3942  (ph/fax)

http://home.teleport.com/~tcl

"The lyfe so short; the craft so long to lerne."
Chaucer  _Parlement of Foules_ 1386

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 07:29:17 -0500
From:    Mary Taylor <Mary@TAYLORARTTECHS.COM>
Subject: Asian style hand scrolls

Does anyone know of a good resource for constructing Asian style hand
scrolls.  I'm looking for information on traditional and contemporary
construction materials.  Also I'm interested in viewing any (hand)
scrolls in exhibition, there are a few sources on the web of past exhibits.

Thank you,
Mary@Taylorarttechs.com

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 08:56:45 -0500
From:    Douglas Sanders <dsanders@INDIANAHISTORY.ORG>
Subject: Re: Asian style hand scrolls

Though directed more at hanging scrolls (kakemono) rather than
handscrolls (makimono), "Japanese Scroll Paintings- A handbook of
mounting techniques" by Masako Koyano, FAIC 1979  ISBN 0 933098 01 4  is
an invaluable resource.  There are, of course many differences in
appearance and function between the two, but tools, lining techniques
and roller attachment will be similar/adaptable for your uses. =20
As for exhibitions, the MFA Boston always has a number of handscrolls on
permanent rotation.  I suspect the same at other museums with strong
Asian collections such as in Cleveland, Seattle, San Francisco,
Washington DC to name a few.

Good luck!

Doug Sanders

 -----Original Message-----
 From: Mary Taylor [mailto:Mary@TAYLORARTTECHS.COM]
 Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 7:29 AM
 To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
 Subject: Asian style hand scrolls
=20
 Does anyone know of a good resource for constructing Asian style hand
 scrolls.  I'm looking for information on traditional and contemporary
 construction materials.  Also I'm interested in viewing any (hand)
 scrolls in exhibition, there are a few sources on the web of past
exhibits.
=20
 Thank you,
 Mary@Taylorarttechs.com
=20
              ***********************************************
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       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
=20
         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
              ***********************************************
------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:12:21 -0500
From:    Virginia Turnbull <virginia@WEBWORKZ.COM>
Subject: Re: Hemp Cord

It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas flax
fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not use a
hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jack C. Thompson" <tcl@TELEPORT.COM>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 1:18 AM
Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Hemp Cord


 As always, it all depends....

 If a flitch of flax (couldn't help m'self), were to be tested alongside
 a hank-O-hemp, all retted the same, then the hemp would likely come out
 ahead of the game.

 Look to Naval Stores.  When compared in equal tests, at sea, rope made
 from hemp did better that rope made from flax/linen.

 However, linen or hemp, sewing supports are not much exposed to storms at
 sea (with any luck) so that doesn't really matter.

 On the other hand, if your hemp cord came from Chinese enzyme retted
fiber,
 it will not be as strong as, for instance, Russian grass retted fiber.

 But, Russian grass retted fiber is not as good as, for instance, Belgian,
 Italian, or Irish retted flax fiber.

 Of course, the Irish don't ret their fiber anymore.  They buy from the
 Belgians and Italians, when they don't buy from the Russians, or Chinese
 (or any number of the new Central European countries.)

 "What was your question?  You in the back..."

 Ah, yes.  Well, that is why I grow, ret, hackle, scutch, and spin my own
 thread and cord from flax when it is important enough.  They would put me
 in jail if I grew hemp.

 Cheers,

 Jack



 >Does anyone on this list know how hemp cord compares to linen cord to
 >sew on? I've been given a sample of hemp cord. It seems very strong,
 >frays out very nicely, and claims to be 100% natural. I have no idea
 >though about its long term use. Any input would be appreciated.
 >
 >Thanks,
 >Frank Lehmann
 >Lehmann Bindery


 Thompson Conservation Lab.
 7549 N. Fenwick
 Portland, Oregon  97217
 USA

 503/735-3942  (ph/fax)

 http://home.teleport.com/~tcl

 "The lyfe so short; the craft so long to lerne."
 Chaucer  _Parlement of Foules_ 1386

              ***********************************************
             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>

         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
 >                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
              ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:36:53 EST
From:    William Minter <WMNTR@AOL.COM>
Subject: Re: Hemp Cord

In a message dated 3/24/03 14:07:45, lehmann@LEHMANNBINDERY.COM writes:

<< Does anyone on this list know how hemp cord compares to linen cord to
sew on? I've been given a sample of hemp cord. It seems very strong,
frays out very nicely, and claims to be 100% natural. I have no idea
though about its long term use. >>

An interesting question:
I don't know the long term difference between Hemp Fiber and Linen (Flax
Fiber), but, as far as I know, I think they are quite similar. In fact, in
some older books, we may be seeing "Hempen" cords instead of linen. The one
thing that I do know is that good linen cord should be "double-boiled and
washed" to remove the harmful "natural" agents/chemicals, like lignin, etc.
Maybe the same is true for Hemp. Chris Clarkson investigated linen cords some
years ago, and the double-boiling was an important factor.

I am also aware that our "so-called" "Unbleached" Linen Thread is most likely
bleached to "improve"(?) its appearance, and to remove some stuff.
Also, I have found that most modern flax is retted with an acid (oxalic?)
rather than the traditional "dew retting" or "_____ retting". Unfortunately,
we are at the mercy of the major fiber suppliers.
What is the long term affect of this retting process on the fiber,
especially, if it is not properly washed out or neutralized?
This is certainly a topic of interest to me. An article was published some
time ago in the Abbey Newsletter.
At the same time, I (and a few others) wonder if we would really be better
off using cotton fiber for thread and cord? Flax, by its nature, is a brittle
fiber. On the other hand, cotton, although not as strong in regards to
tensile strength, is much better suited for flexing, as in the cords --
Another interesting topic?

Bill Minter
William Minter Bookbinding & Conservation, Inc.
Woodbury, PA
814-793-4020
fax 814-793-4045

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 10:35:45 EST
From:    Barbara Harman <ArtSurvive@AOL.COM>
Subject: The_Pennies?

Paul - May  I forward this to friends? Barbara Harman

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 10:36:33 EST
From:    DanceMarathon1@AOL.COM
Subject: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Photos=20of=2016th-18th=20c.=A0=20Hand=20Book=20P?=
         =?ISO-8859-1?Q?resses?=

 Hi Dwayne-
  Not certain this will be of any help, but it's worth a try.
 I purchased a font from Crazy Diamond Historical Fonts in UK.=20
 Alex Moseley just might have a suggestion.=20
<</A><A HREF=3D"mailto:<cdd@crazydiamond.co.uk>">cdd@crazydiamond.co.uk></A=

Also you might try contacting:=20
Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol St. SE
Washington, DC 20003=20

still dancing,
alice

a l i c e     s i m p s o n

http://forum.criticaldance.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=3Dget_topic;f=3D11=
;t=3D0013

08#000000
THE DANCING CHANCELLOR:<A HREF=3D"http://tudorhistory.org/news/hatton.html";>=
 http://tudorhistory.org/news/hatton.html</A>



=20
 Date:=A0 =A0 Mon, 24 Mar 2003 10:30:46 -0500
 From:=A0 =A0 Digital Rare Books <CD@DIGITALRAREBOOKS.COM>
 Subject: Photos of 16th-18th c.=A0 Hand Book Presses ?
=20
 Greetings:
 Would anyone have any photos or resources who do, of 16th-18th c. Hand=20=
=3D
 Book Presses.
=20
 We have already checked Diderot.
=20
=20
 Best Regards,
 Dwayne Shealey
=20
 Antiquarian Collections
 1836 Ashley River Rd.=A0 Suite 250
 Charleston, SC=A0 29407
 PH: (843) 813-3100=A0=A0 FX: (843) 813-7167
 Antiquarian@Antiquarian-Collections.com
=20
=20
------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 11:02:22 -0500
From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
Subject: Re: The_Pennies?

Barbara,

        Certainly.  I believe that is in the spirit of what we do.

                Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Barbara Harman
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 10:36 AM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Subject: The_Pennies?


Paul - May  I forward this to friends? Barbara Harman

             ***********************************************
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            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
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------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:19:42 -0800
From:    Susan Fatemi <susanf@PEER.BERKELEY.EDU>
Subject: Re: Hemp Cord

At 09:12 AM 3/25/2003 -0500, you wrote:
It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas flax
fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not use a
hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.
I have to chime in here: there's no connection between hemp and
burlap. Burlap is made from jute, and does deteriorate fairly
quickly (you can plant things still wrapped in burlap and it will
just rot away).

Hemp is a completely different plant and fiber, cannabis sativa.
It is resistant to mildew, sun-rot, etc. Sailing ship sails were
made from hemp, which was considered superior to canvas made
from linen and certainly cotton. Supposedly, the original distributed
copies of the Declaration of Independence were printed on hemp
paper (there's irony for you).

I know many of the organizations in this country currently touting
the benefits of hemp have a drug agenda, but it really is a wonderful
fiber.


Susan Fatemi
susanf@peer.berkeley.edu

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 12:44:10 -0500
From:    Douglas Sanders <dsanders@INDIANAHISTORY.ORG>
Subject: Re: Hemp Cord

I've pulled some of my old Institute of Paper Conservation journals off
the shelf.  There were some excellent fiber identification guides a few
years back (early 80's).  In them, the authors- Collings and Milner-
state that many materials are known as hemp but are of a completely
different genus than Cannabis sativa.  They list at least twelve with
the word 'Hemp' in their common name.  I think that this means what we
can currently buy labeled Hemp in terms of thread, cord and paper may or
may not be the genuine product.  Manilla Hemp (Musa textilis) as the
name suggests was and is used for textiles and I wonder if much of
today's products come from this source.=20
As for the Declaration of Independence, though I haven't read a fiber
analysis, I suspect it wasn't completely made of a 'hempen' fiber.  Such
paper would have been extremely coarse and somewhat rigid.  During the
1700's paper furnish came from recycled materials- ropes, sails, sailor
uniforms have all been implicated- rather than raw material, generally.
My guess is that small fibers from ropes found their way into the pulp
vat largely composed of linen and/or cotton, and now we have a legend
that the Founding Fathers printed on hemp.

Doug Sanders

 -----Original Message-----
 From: Susan Fatemi [mailto:susanf@PEER.BERKELEY.EDU]
 Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 12:20 PM
 To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
 Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
=20
 At 09:12 AM 3/25/2003 -0500, you wrote:
 >It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas
flax
 >fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not
use a
 >hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.
=20
 I have to chime in here: there's no connection between hemp and
 burlap. Burlap is made from jute, and does deteriorate fairly
 quickly (you can plant things still wrapped in burlap and it will
 just rot away).
=20
 Hemp is a completely different plant and fiber, cannabis sativa.
 It is resistant to mildew, sun-rot, etc. Sailing ship sails were
 made from hemp, which was considered superior to canvas made
 from linen and certainly cotton. Supposedly, the original distributed
 copies of the Declaration of Independence were printed on hemp
 > paper (there's irony for you).
=20
 I know many of the organizations in this country currently touting
 the benefits of hemp have a drug agenda, but it really is a wonderful
 fiber.
=20
=20
 Susan Fatemi
 susanf@peer.berkeley.edu
=20
              ***********************************************
             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
=20
         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
              ***********************************************
------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 12:54:47 -0500
From:    Virginia Turnbull <virginia@WEBWORKZ.COM>
Subject: Re: Hemp Cord

Ah.   I remember now!
Thanks.   I stand corrected!  Sorry.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Susan Fatemi" <susanf@PEER.BERKELEY.EDU>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 12:19 PM
Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Hemp Cord


 At 09:12 AM 3/25/2003 -0500, you wrote:
 >It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas flax
 >fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not use
a
 >hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.

 I have to chime in here: there's no connection between hemp and
 burlap. Burlap is made from jute, and does deteriorate fairly
 quickly (you can plant things still wrapped in burlap and it will
 just rot away).

 Hemp is a completely different plant and fiber, cannabis sativa.
 It is resistant to mildew, sun-rot, etc. Sailing ship sails were
 made from hemp, which was considered superior to canvas made
 from linen and certainly cotton. Supposedly, the original distributed
 copies of the Declaration of Independence were printed on hemp
 paper (there's irony for you).

 I know many of the organizations in this country currently touting
 the benefits of hemp have a drug agenda, but it really is a wonderful
 fiber.


 Susan Fatemi
 susanf@peer.berkeley.edu

              ***********************************************
             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>

         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
              ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 19:47:31 +0100
From:    Florian Wolper <f.wolper@GMX.NET>
Subject: AW: Travelling to Munich

Hi!

You could have a look at Boesner at Forstinning. It is not exactly in
Munich, but it is still in the reach of the public traffic connections.

Further information about boesner

www.boesner.ch



------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------
ICQ: 213338109
http://community.webshots.com/user/flori76

-----Urspr=FCngliche Nachricht-----
Von: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU] Im Auftrag von Peter Verheyen
Gesendet: Montag, 24. M=E4rz 2003 16:10
An: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Betreff: Travelling to Munich

I will be traveling to Munich, Germany (and possibly to Salzburg,
Austria)
for the Easter holiday. Does anyone know of paper stores or bookbinding
stores that would be good to visit?
Mark Palkovic


Mark Palkovic
Head Librarian
College-Conservatory of Music Library
417 Blegen Library, P.O. Box 210152
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0152
Voice: 513 556-1964
Fax: 513 556-3777

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 11:36:19 -0800
From:    Gerald Lange <Bieler@WORLDNET.ATT.NET>
Subject: Wooden common presses?

The following publication has an informative article containing
numerous photographs of reconstructed historical wood common presses
that exist in various institutions.

Quaerendo
Quarterly Journal of the Low Countries Devoted to Manuscripts and
Printed Books"
Volume 32, #3&4, Summer & Autumn 2002

"Reconstruction of the common press: aims and results"
Frans A Janssen
pp 175-198

Would anyone have any photos or resources who do, of 16th-18th c. Hand =
Book Presses.

We have already checked Diderot.


Best Regards,

Dwayne Shealey

Antiquarian Collections
1836 Ashley River Rd.  Suite 250
Charleston, SC  29407
PH: (843) 813-3100   FX: (843) 813-7167
Antiquarian@Antiquarian-Collections.com

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 14:52:37 -0500
From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
Subject: <No subject given>

Barbara

        Don't worry about it.  Fortunately, I've learned not to delete
things too quickly.  Guess why!

                Paul

RJ

        It is difficult to decide on the best treatment, sight unseen.  The
first thing is to check the grain direction of the page.  Normally the grain
is vertical, but it is not all that unusual to find that a horizontal grain
is used as a cost cutting measure, such as the 9" horizontal measurement
would allow.  It is a simple matter to test for grain direction.  Lightly
bend one of the pages halfway over; bounce your fingers along the back of
the sheet; if the bend is against the grain, you will feel more resistance
or spring coming from the sheet.  Since the sheets are bound into the book,
it would not be possible to bend the sheet toward the vertical direction,
although the grain direction can be tested by running the edge of the sheet
between the nails of the thumb and forefinger.  If the grain is vertical,
there will be no noticeable change.  If the grain is horizontal, however,
there will be a pronounced rippling along the edge.  A good reason for using
the former test to determine the grain direction.  If the grain direction is
horizontal, then it's probably best that you get used to seeing that "1/16
inch in the middle."

        Creating a humidification chamber is relatively simple.  The most
difficult part is deciding on the best way to proceed with a particular
case.  The objective is to thoroughly humidify the pages of the book in a
closed chamber, the opened book safely placed on an open grid support, such
as, the plastic diffuser paneling for fluorescent lighting, periodically
leafing through the book and opening to a different section of the book.
The closed chamber can be made by simply placing a cardboard box over the
whole thing, perhaps even covering the box with plastic sheeting.  The main
thing is to keep the book surrounded by moist air.   Mother Nature will take
care of the rest.

        Once the book is thoroughly humidified, I recommend interleafing
each of the 375 pages with a piece of waxed paper that has been cut to the
same size as the page itself.  I know it's a lot of cutting, but the waxed
paper will keep the unavoidable swell in the thickness of the book to a
minimum.  [I recommend Reynolds Cut-Rite Wax Paper.]  Once that is done,
place a nonabsorbent panel over the book and apply enough weight to assure
contact pressure only.  Then wait until the book and its pages are thorough
dry!

        It's a slow drying process, but an effective one.  Once the pages
are thoroughly humidified, they will return to their original condition.
With the wax paper in place, only the edges of the page will dry.  As the
edges dry, however, the remaining moisture will steadily migrate to the
edges of the sheet, where it will evaporate, only to be replaced by the next
in line.

        Once the process is complete and the book is dry, remove the wax
paper.  I recommend keeping the book under contact pressure for a couple of
days, just to allow time for the book to mature in the surrounding
environment.

        It's a simple procedure.  And like most things, it takes time.  Good
luck!

                Paul Martin

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 15:22:12 -0500
From:    Eric Alstrom <eric.c.alstrom@DARTMOUTH.EDU>
Subject: Re: drying books

I just got back from vacation and am jumping in on this thread in the
middle, so please pardon my confused state or if I am repeating an already
asked question...

Paul,

I understand the theory of interleaving, either with waxed paper or
absorbent towelling.  But in practice, how do you interleave between EVERY
page in such a large book?

In my experience, even interleaving every 10 pages or so creates such a
swell that A) the book won't close in order to palce a weight on top of the
book and B) the binding can be damaged from all the added thickness, even if
you can get the waxed paper all the way to the spine on every page.

I would like to hear how you (and others on the list) accomplish this or are
there other methods of interleaving which binders/conservators find
successful.

Thanks,
Eric

on 3/25/03 2:52 PM, Paul D. Martin at PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:

 Once the book is thoroughly humidified, I recommend interleafing
 each of the 375 pages with a piece of waxed paper that has been cut to the
 same size as the page itself.  I know it's a lot of cutting, but the waxed
 paper will keep the unavoidable swell in the thickness of the book to a
 minimum.  [I recommend Reynolds Cut-Rite Wax Paper.]  Once that is done,
 place a nonabsorbent panel over the book and apply enough weight to assure
 contact pressure only.  Then wait until the book and its pages are thorough
 dry!

*****************************************
 Eric Alstrom      Collections Conservator
 Dartmouth College      Hanover, NH
 603-646-1452      eric.c.alstrom@dartmouth.edu
 www.dartmouth.edu/~preserve/
*****************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 16:03:50 EST
From:    Patricia Grass <PAGrass@AOL.COM>
Subject: Re: Asian style hand scrolls

Try looking at the Dunhung Project--  go to    http://idp.bl.uk
then click on  special topics and then Chinese Bookbinding

It has great information about Chinese Bookbinding including scrolls. I made
a "whirlwind" scroll from this page and found the information very clear and
helpful.

Patricia Grass

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 16:13:30 -0600
From:    Duncan <tvjunkie@TVJUNKIE.NET>
Subject: bookfilter

A new site dedicated to book discussion.


http://www.bookfilter.com


Original link from http://www.metafilter.com


--
******************************************
"I can dream about being Bugs Bunny,
but when I wake up I'm Daffy"

        - Chuck Jones


   Duncan   http://www.campbell-logan.com

        Campbell-Logan Bindery, Inc.
              Minneapolis, MN
******************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 15:40:34 -0800
From:    Julia DeHoff <juliadehoff@YAHOO.COM>
Subject: Japanese punch drill

I just purchased a Japanese punch drill, but since the
instructions are in Japanese, I thought I'd ask for
advice.
How much can it punch through at once?
Do you need to clean the paper circles out of the
drill? If so, how do you do that?
Any guidance you can give me about how to get the best
performance out of this tool will be greatly
appreciated.
If this is in the archives, what's the thread topic?
Thanks.
Julia in Tallahassee


__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
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------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 20:05:40 EST
From:    Barbara Harman <ArtSurvive@AOL.COM>
Subject: <No subject given>

Hi Paul - Actually, it was the posting about PENNIES awards that I wanted. Do
you still have that or have I sent this post to the entirely wrong person?
It's been a loooong day! Barbara

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 20:36:34 -0500
From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
Subject: Re: drying books

Eric,

        Point well taken.  That is the difficulty of dealing with
anything sight
unseen.  The principle is sound; the trick is in the adaptation.  To begin
with, for example, I would determine the maximum allowable swell and
interleaf accordingly.  I prefer wax paper, because it is about as thin an
insert as you can find and it is not moisture absorbent [which is why I
favor the use of the wax paper.]  Periodically then, I would reposition the
inserts in each subdivision or section of the book to promote an even rate
of drying.  Variations will abound, but the principle remains the same.  It
all depends.

        Thanks for pointing that out.

                Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Eric Alstrom
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 3:22 PM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Subject: Re: drying books


I just got back from vacation and am jumping in on this thread in the
middle, so please pardon my confused state or if I am repeating an already
asked question...

Paul,

I understand the theory of interleaving, either with waxed paper or
absorbent towelling.  But in practice, how do you interleave between EVERY
page in such a large book?

In my experience, even interleaving every 10 pages or so creates such a
swell that A) the book won't close in order to palce a weight on top of the
book and B) the binding can be damaged from all the added thickness, even if
you can get the waxed paper all the way to the spine on every page.

I would like to hear how you (and others on the list) accomplish this or are
there other methods of interleaving which binders/conservators find
successful.

Thanks,
Eric

on 3/25/03 2:52 PM, Paul D. Martin at PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:

 Once the book is thoroughly humidified, I recommend interleafing
 each of the 375 pages with a piece of waxed paper that has been cut to the
 same size as the page itself.  I know it's a lot of cutting, but the waxed
 paper will keep the unavoidable swell in the thickness of the book to a
 minimum.  [I recommend Reynolds Cut-Rite Wax Paper.]  Once that is done,
 place a nonabsorbent panel over the book and apply enough weight to assure
 contact pressure only.  Then wait until the book and its pages are
thorough
 dry!

*****************************************
 Eric Alstrom      Collections Conservator
 Dartmouth College      Hanover, NH
 603-646-1452      eric.c.alstrom@dartmouth.edu
 www.dartmouth.edu/~preserve/
*****************************************

             ***********************************************
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      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

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------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 20:46:38 -0500
From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
Subject: <No subject given>

Hi, Barbara,

         Oops!  Sorry.  I don't have.  But it was nice to meet you, anyway.

                Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Barbara Harman
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 8:06 PM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Subject: Re:


Hi Paul - Actually, it was the posting about PENNIES awards that I wanted.
Do
you still have that or have I sent this post to the entirely wrong person?
It's been a loooong day! Barbara

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 21:01:47 -0500
From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
Subject: Re: Japanese punch drill

Hi, Julia,

        I'm not quite sure of what you mean by a punch drill, but if
it is like the
one that I have, it is just a matter of putting in the particular punch that
you need to give you the hole that you want.  It will go through any given
number of sheets of paper, depending on the paper that you are using.  The
punch outs accumulate to the point, I suppose, that they come out of their
own accord.  [I never let them accumulate to that point.]  Hope this helps.
But it is indeed a very handy tool!

        Paul in Buffalo

-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Julia DeHoff
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 6:41 PM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Subject: Japanese punch drill


I just purchased a Japanese punch drill, but since the
instructions are in Japanese, I thought I'd ask for
advice.
How much can it punch through at once?
Do you need to clean the paper circles out of the
drill? If so, how do you do that?
Any guidance you can give me about how to get the best
performance out of this tool will be greatly
appreciated.
If this is in the archives, what's the thread topic?
Thanks.
Julia in Tallahassee


__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
http://platinum.yahoo.com

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 23:27:15 -0500
From:    Terry Belanger <belanger@VIRGINIA.EDU>
Subject: Freshest Advices: March 2003

Freshest Advices: March 2003 (distributed to the Book_arts-L, ExLibris, and
SHARP electronic bulletin boards 25 Mar 2003)

New RBS Map Course. Rare Book School is pleased to announce that David
Woodward, Arthur H. Robinson Professor of Georgraphy Emeritus at the
University of Wisconsin, has agreed to teach an RBS course on the history
of maps, beginning in March 2004. Woodward is the Founding Editor of The
History of Cartography Project; see:

         http://www.geography.wisc.edu/histcart/

The Project is:
a research, editorial, and publishing venture drawing international
attention to the history of maps and mapping. The Project's major work is
the multi-volume History of Cartography series. Its interdisciplinary
approach brings together scholars in the arts, sciences, and humanities. By
considering previously ignored aspects of cartographic history, the Project
encourages a broader view of maps that has significantly influenced other
fields of study.

Woodward is the author of "Catalogue of Watermarks in Italian Maps, ca.
1540 - 1600" (Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 1996); "The All-American Map: Wax
Engraving and Its Influence on Cartography" (Chicago 1977); and many other
books and articles;  he edited "Five Centuries of Map Printing" (Chicago
1975) and "Art and Cartography: Six Historical Essays" (Chicago 1987); for
his vita, see

         http://www.geography.wisc.edu/faculty/woodward/


Schiller Malkin Lecture. Nearly ten years ago at RBS, Justin G. Schiller
gave the 1993 Sol. M. and Mary Ann O'Brian Malkin Lecture in Bibliography.
His subject was the history of the antiquarian trade in collectible
children's books. The wheels grind slowly here -- but they do move. We are
pleased finally to announce the publication of Schiller's 48-page lecture,
as "Pioneering Collectible Children's Books: The First One Hundred Years."
The price of the 48-page lecture is $10. For ordering details, see

         http://www.virginia.edu/oldbooks/publications.shtml

Incidentally, Bernard M. Rosenthal's wonderful 1986 Malkin lecture is now
back in print, with a new postscript: The Gentle Invasion: Continental
Emigre Booksellers of the Thirties and Forties and Their Impact on the
Antiquarian Booktrade in the United States.
     Greer Allen will deliver the 2003 Sol M. and Mary Ann O'Brian Malkin
Lecture in Bibliography at UVa on Monday, 14 July, in Room 201 Clemons
Library. His title: "Everything I Know about Book Design I Learned at the
Race Track."


Books in Sheets. RBS owns seven copies of the 1691 duodecimo book, Actus
interni virtutum ad Beatissimam Virginem Mariam (Dillingen: Joan. Casp.
Bencard), all in flat sheets, as well as one or more copies of about two
dozen other books in sheets. We've recently posted a fairly detailed list
of our holdings of books in sheets on our Web site at
http://www.virginia.edu/oldbooks/misc/misc.html

We'd be very glad to know of the existence of other pre-1801 books in
sheets, both in institutional collections and in antiquarian booksellers'
catalogs.

Terry Belanger : University Professor : University of Virginia : Rare Book
School : 114 Alderman Library : Charlottesville, VA  22903 : Telephone
434/924-8851   fax 434/924-8824   email belanger@virginia.edu : URL
<http://www.rarebookschool.org>

------------------------------

End of BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 24 Mar 2003 to 25 Mar 2003 (#2003-84)
*****************************************************************

--

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           BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
     For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
           resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                     <http://www.philobiblon.com>

       Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                   <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
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