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Re: [BKARTS] Japanese punch drill (2)



It is by far my favorite tool-- very worth the money.

-----Original Message-----
From: Heidi Tuhkanen [mailto:heidi@PACHAMAMA.ORG]
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 12:06 PM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
Subject: Japanese punch drill (2)


I am curious to know whether you like your Japanese Punch Drill. In
having gone through the threads on the archive, I cannot tell whether
people have had positive experiences with them or not.

Best,
Heidi

>There are 23 messages totalling 1090 lines in this issue.
>
>Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Hemp Cord (6)
>   2. Asian style hand scrolls (3)
>   3. The_Pennies? (2)
>   4. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Photos=20of=2016th-18th=20c.=A0=20Hand=20Book=20P?=
>      =?ISO-8859-1?Q?resses?=
>   5. AW: Travelling to Munich
>   6. Wooden common presses?
>   7. <No subject given> (3)
>   8. drying books (2)
>   9. bookfilter
>  10. Japanese punch drill (2)
>  11. Freshest Advices: March 2003
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Date:    Mon, 24 Mar 2003 22:18:54 -0800
>From:    "Jack C. Thompson" <tcl@TELEPORT.COM>
>Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
>
>As always, it all depends....
>
>If a flitch of flax (couldn't help m'self), were to be tested alongside
>a hank-O-hemp, all retted the same, then the hemp would likely come out
>ahead of the game.
>
>Look to Naval Stores.  When compared in equal tests, at sea, rope made
>from hemp did better that rope made from flax/linen.
>
>However, linen or hemp, sewing supports are not much exposed to storms at
>sea (with any luck) so that doesn't really matter.
>
>On the other hand, if your hemp cord came from Chinese enzyme retted fiber,
>it will not be as strong as, for instance, Russian grass retted fiber.
>
>But, Russian grass retted fiber is not as good as, for instance, Belgian,
>Italian, or Irish retted flax fiber.
>
>Of course, the Irish don't ret their fiber anymore.  They buy from the
>Belgians and Italians, when they don't buy from the Russians, or Chinese
>(or any number of the new Central European countries.)
>
>"What was your question?  You in the back..."
>
>Ah, yes.  Well, that is why I grow, ret, hackle, scutch, and spin my own
>thread and cord from flax when it is important enough.  They would put me
>in jail if I grew hemp.
>
>Cheers,
>
>Jack
>
>
>
>>Does anyone on this list know how hemp cord compares to linen cord to
>>sew on? I've been given a sample of hemp cord. It seems very strong,
>>frays out very nicely, and claims to be 100% natural. I have no idea
>>though about its long term use. Any input would be appreciated.
>>
>>Thanks,
>>Frank Lehmann
>>Lehmann Bindery
>
>
>Thompson Conservation Lab.
>7549 N. Fenwick
>Portland, Oregon  97217
>USA
>
>503/735-3942  (ph/fax)
>
>http://home.teleport.com/~tcl
>
>"The lyfe so short; the craft so long to lerne."
>Chaucer  _Parlement of Foules_ 1386
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 07:29:17 -0500
>From:    Mary Taylor <Mary@TAYLORARTTECHS.COM>
>Subject: Asian style hand scrolls
>
>Does anyone know of a good resource for constructing Asian style hand
>scrolls.  I'm looking for information on traditional and contemporary
>construction materials.  Also I'm interested in viewing any (hand)
>scrolls in exhibition, there are a few sources on the web of past exhibits.
>
>Thank you,
>Mary@Taylorarttechs.com
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 08:56:45 -0500
>From:    Douglas Sanders <dsanders@INDIANAHISTORY.ORG>
>Subject: Re: Asian style hand scrolls
>
>Though directed more at hanging scrolls (kakemono) rather than
>handscrolls (makimono), "Japanese Scroll Paintings- A handbook of
>mounting techniques" by Masako Koyano, FAIC 1979  ISBN 0 933098 01 4  is
>an invaluable resource.  There are, of course many differences in
>appearance and function between the two, but tools, lining techniques
>and roller attachment will be similar/adaptable for your uses. =20
>As for exhibitions, the MFA Boston always has a number of handscrolls on
>permanent rotation.  I suspect the same at other museums with strong
>Asian collections such as in Cleveland, Seattle, San Francisco,
>Washington DC to name a few.
>
>Good luck!
>
>Doug Sanders
>
>>  -----Original Message-----
>>  From: Mary Taylor [mailto:Mary@TAYLORARTTECHS.COM]
>>  Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 7:29 AM
>>  To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>>  Subject: Asian style hand scrolls
>>=20
>>  Does anyone know of a good resource for constructing Asian style hand
>>  scrolls.  I'm looking for information on traditional and contemporary
>>  construction materials.  Also I'm interested in viewing any (hand)
>>  scrolls in exhibition, there are a few sources on the web of past
>exhibits.
>>=20
>>  Thank you,
>>  Mary@Taylorarttechs.com
>>=20
>>               ***********************************************
>>              BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>>        For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>>              resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>>                        <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>=20
>>          Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>>                      <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>>               ***********************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:12:21 -0500
>From:    Virginia Turnbull <virginia@WEBWORKZ.COM>
>Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
>
>It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas flax
>fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not use a
>hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Jack C. Thompson" <tcl@TELEPORT.COM>
>To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
>Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 1:18 AM
>Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Hemp Cord
>
>
>>  As always, it all depends....
>>
>>  If a flitch of flax (couldn't help m'self), were to be tested alongside
>>  a hank-O-hemp, all retted the same, then the hemp would likely come out
>>  ahead of the game.
>>
>>  Look to Naval Stores.  When compared in equal tests, at sea, rope made
>>  from hemp did better that rope made from flax/linen.
>>
>>  However, linen or hemp, sewing supports are not much exposed to storms at
>>  sea (with any luck) so that doesn't really matter.
>>
>>  On the other hand, if your hemp cord came from Chinese enzyme retted
>fiber,
>>  it will not be as strong as, for instance, Russian grass retted fiber.
>>
>>  But, Russian grass retted fiber is not as good as, for instance, Belgian,
>>  Italian, or Irish retted flax fiber.
>>
>>  Of course, the Irish don't ret their fiber anymore.  They buy from the
>>  Belgians and Italians, when they don't buy from the Russians, or Chinese
>>  (or any number of the new Central European countries.)
>>
>>  "What was your question?  You in the back..."
>>
>>  Ah, yes.  Well, that is why I grow, ret, hackle, scutch, and spin my own
>>  thread and cord from flax when it is important enough.  They would put me
>>  in jail if I grew hemp.
>>
>>  Cheers,
>>
>>  Jack
>>
>>
>>
>>  >Does anyone on this list know how hemp cord compares to linen cord to
>>  >sew on? I've been given a sample of hemp cord. It seems very strong,
>>  >frays out very nicely, and claims to be 100% natural. I have no idea
>>  >though about its long term use. Any input would be appreciated.
>>  >
>>  >Thanks,
>>  >Frank Lehmann
>>  >Lehmann Bindery
>>
>>
>>  Thompson Conservation Lab.
>>  7549 N. Fenwick
>>  Portland, Oregon  97217
>>  USA
>>
>>  503/735-3942  (ph/fax)
>>
>>  http://home.teleport.com/~tcl
>>
>>  "The lyfe so short; the craft so long to lerne."
>>  Chaucer  _Parlement of Foules_ 1386
>>
>>               ***********************************************
>>              BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>>        For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>>              resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>>                        <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>
>>          Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>  >                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>>               ***********************************************
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:36:53 EST
>From:    William Minter <WMNTR@AOL.COM>
>Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
>
>In a message dated 3/24/03 14:07:45, lehmann@LEHMANNBINDERY.COM writes:
>
><< Does anyone on this list know how hemp cord compares to linen cord to
>sew on? I've been given a sample of hemp cord. It seems very strong,
>frays out very nicely, and claims to be 100% natural. I have no idea
>though about its long term use. >>
>
>An interesting question:
>I don't know the long term difference between Hemp Fiber and Linen (Flax
>Fiber), but, as far as I know, I think they are quite similar. In fact, in
>some older books, we may be seeing "Hempen" cords instead of linen. The one
>thing that I do know is that good linen cord should be "double-boiled and
>washed" to remove the harmful "natural" agents/chemicals, like lignin, etc.
>Maybe the same is true for Hemp. Chris Clarkson investigated linen cords some
>years ago, and the double-boiling was an important factor.
>
>I am also aware that our "so-called" "Unbleached" Linen Thread is most likely
>bleached to "improve"(?) its appearance, and to remove some stuff.
>Also, I have found that most modern flax is retted with an acid (oxalic?)
>rather than the traditional "dew retting" or "_____ retting". Unfortunately,
>we are at the mercy of the major fiber suppliers.
>What is the long term affect of this retting process on the fiber,
>especially, if it is not properly washed out or neutralized?
>This is certainly a topic of interest to me. An article was published some
>time ago in the Abbey Newsletter.
>At the same time, I (and a few others) wonder if we would really be better
>off using cotton fiber for thread and cord? Flax, by its nature, is a brittle
>fiber. On the other hand, cotton, although not as strong in regards to
>tensile strength, is much better suited for flexing, as in the cords --
>Another interesting topic?
>
>Bill Minter
>William Minter Bookbinding & Conservation, Inc.
>Woodbury, PA
>814-793-4020
>fax 814-793-4045
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 10:35:45 EST
>From:    Barbara Harman <ArtSurvive@AOL.COM>
>Subject: The_Pennies?
>
>Paul - May  I forward this to friends? Barbara Harman
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 10:36:33 EST
>From:    DanceMarathon1@AOL.COM
>Subject: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Photos=20of=2016th-18th=20c.=A0=20Hand=20Book=20P?=
>          =?ISO-8859-1?Q?resses?=
>
>>  Hi Dwayne-
>>   Not certain this will be of any help, but it's worth a try.
>  I purchased a font from Crazy Diamond Historical Fonts in UK.=20
>  Alex Moseley just might have a suggestion.=20
>><</A><A HREF=3D"mailto:<cdd@crazydiamond.co.uk>">cdd@crazydiamond.co.uk></A=
>>
>
>Also you might try contacting:=20
>Folger Shakespeare Library
>201 East Capitol St. SE
>Washington, DC 20003=20
>
>still dancing,
>alice
>
>a l i c e     s i m p s o n
>
>http://forum.criticaldance.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=3Dget_topic;f=3D11=
>;t=3D0013
>
>08#000000
>THE DANCING CHANCELLOR:<A HREF=3D"http://tudorhistory.org/news/hatton.html";>=
>  http://tudorhistory.org/news/hatton.html</A>
>
>
>
>=20
>>  Date:=A0 =A0 Mon, 24 Mar 2003 10:30:46 -0500
>>  From:=A0 =A0 Digital Rare Books <CD@DIGITALRAREBOOKS.COM>
>>  Subject: Photos of 16th-18th c.=A0 Hand Book Presses ?
>>=20
>>  Greetings:
>>  Would anyone have any photos or resources who do, of 16th-18th c. Hand=20=
>=3D
>>  Book Presses.
>>=20
>>  We have already checked Diderot.
>>=20
>>=20
>>  Best Regards,
>>  Dwayne Shealey
>>=20
>>  Antiquarian Collections
>>  1836 Ashley River Rd.=A0 Suite 250
>>  Charleston, SC=A0 29407
>>  PH: (843) 813-3100=A0=A0 FX: (843) 813-7167
>>  Antiquarian@Antiquarian-Collections.com
>>=20
>>=20
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 11:02:22 -0500
>From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
>Subject: Re: The_Pennies?
>
>Barbara,
>
>         Certainly.  I believe that is in the spirit of what we do.
>
>                 Paul
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
>[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Barbara Harman
>Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 10:36 AM
>To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>Subject: The_Pennies?
>
>
>Paul - May  I forward this to friends? Barbara Harman
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:19:42 -0800
>From:    Susan Fatemi <susanf@PEER.BERKELEY.EDU>
>Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
>
>At 09:12 AM 3/25/2003 -0500, you wrote:
>>It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas flax
>>fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not use a
>>hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.
>
>I have to chime in here: there's no connection between hemp and
>burlap. Burlap is made from jute, and does deteriorate fairly
>quickly (you can plant things still wrapped in burlap and it will
>just rot away).
>
>Hemp is a completely different plant and fiber, cannabis sativa.
>It is resistant to mildew, sun-rot, etc. Sailing ship sails were
>made from hemp, which was considered superior to canvas made
>from linen and certainly cotton. Supposedly, the original distributed
>copies of the Declaration of Independence were printed on hemp
>paper (there's irony for you).
>
>I know many of the organizations in this country currently touting
>the benefits of hemp have a drug agenda, but it really is a wonderful
>fiber.
>
>
>Susan Fatemi
>susanf@peer.berkeley.edu
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 12:44:10 -0500
>From:    Douglas Sanders <dsanders@INDIANAHISTORY.ORG>
>Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
>
>I've pulled some of my old Institute of Paper Conservation journals off
>the shelf.  There were some excellent fiber identification guides a few
>years back (early 80's).  In them, the authors- Collings and Milner-
>state that many materials are known as hemp but are of a completely
>different genus than Cannabis sativa.  They list at least twelve with
>the word 'Hemp' in their common name.  I think that this means what we
>can currently buy labeled Hemp in terms of thread, cord and paper may or
>may not be the genuine product.  Manilla Hemp (Musa textilis) as the
>name suggests was and is used for textiles and I wonder if much of
>today's products come from this source.=20
>As for the Declaration of Independence, though I haven't read a fiber
>analysis, I suspect it wasn't completely made of a 'hempen' fiber.  Such
>paper would have been extremely coarse and somewhat rigid.  During the
>1700's paper furnish came from recycled materials- ropes, sails, sailor
>uniforms have all been implicated- rather than raw material, generally.
>My guess is that small fibers from ropes found their way into the pulp
>vat largely composed of linen and/or cotton, and now we have a legend
>that the Founding Fathers printed on hemp.
>
>Doug Sanders
>
>>  -----Original Message-----
>>  From: Susan Fatemi [mailto:susanf@PEER.BERKELEY.EDU]
>>  Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 12:20 PM
>>  To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>>  Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
>>=20
>>  At 09:12 AM 3/25/2003 -0500, you wrote:
>>  >It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas
>flax
>>  >fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not
>use a
>>  >hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.
>>=20
>>  I have to chime in here: there's no connection between hemp and
>>  burlap. Burlap is made from jute, and does deteriorate fairly
>>  quickly (you can plant things still wrapped in burlap and it will
>>  just rot away).
>>=20
>>  Hemp is a completely different plant and fiber, cannabis sativa.
>>  It is resistant to mildew, sun-rot, etc. Sailing ship sails were
>>  made from hemp, which was considered superior to canvas made
>>  from linen and certainly cotton. Supposedly, the original distributed
>>  copies of the Declaration of Independence were printed on hemp
>  > paper (there's irony for you).
>>=20
>>  I know many of the organizations in this country currently touting
>>  the benefits of hemp have a drug agenda, but it really is a wonderful
>>  fiber.
>>=20
>>=20
>>  Susan Fatemi
>>  susanf@peer.berkeley.edu
>>=20
>>               ***********************************************
>>              BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>>        For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>>              resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>>                        <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>=20
>>          Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>>                      <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>>               ***********************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 12:54:47 -0500
>From:    Virginia Turnbull <virginia@WEBWORKZ.COM>
>Subject: Re: Hemp Cord
>
>Ah.   I remember now!
>Thanks.   I stand corrected!  Sorry.
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Susan Fatemi" <susanf@PEER.BERKELEY.EDU>
>To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
>Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 12:19 PM
>Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Hemp Cord
>
>
>>  At 09:12 AM 3/25/2003 -0500, you wrote:
>>  >It's my understanding that hemp fibers deteriorate over time whereas flax
>>  >fibers do not.  I've read that people who make hooked rugs should not use
>a
>>  >hemp/burlap fabric as a rug base for that reason.
>>
>>  I have to chime in here: there's no connection between hemp and
>>  burlap. Burlap is made from jute, and does deteriorate fairly
>>  quickly (you can plant things still wrapped in burlap and it will
>>  just rot away).
>>
>>  Hemp is a completely different plant and fiber, cannabis sativa.
>>  It is resistant to mildew, sun-rot, etc. Sailing ship sails were
>>  made from hemp, which was considered superior to canvas made
>>  from linen and certainly cotton. Supposedly, the original distributed
>>  copies of the Declaration of Independence were printed on hemp
>>  paper (there's irony for you).
>>
>>  I know many of the organizations in this country currently touting
>>  the benefits of hemp have a drug agenda, but it really is a wonderful
>>  fiber.
>>
>>
>>  Susan Fatemi
>>  susanf@peer.berkeley.edu
>>
>>               ***********************************************
>>              BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>>        For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>>              resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>>                        <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>>
>>          Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>>                      <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>>               ***********************************************
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 19:47:31 +0100
>From:    Florian Wolper <f.wolper@GMX.NET>
>Subject: AW: Travelling to Munich
>
>Hi!
>
>You could have a look at Boesner at Forstinning. It is not exactly in
>Munich, but it is still in the reach of the public traffic connections.
>
>Further information about boesner
>
>www.boesner.ch
>
>
>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
>------------
>ICQ: 213338109
>http://community.webshots.com/user/flori76
>
>-----Urspr=FCngliche Nachricht-----
>Von: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
>[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU] Im Auftrag von Peter Verheyen
>Gesendet: Montag, 24. M=E4rz 2003 16:10
>An: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>Betreff: Travelling to Munich
>
>I will be traveling to Munich, Germany (and possibly to Salzburg,
>Austria)
>for the Easter holiday. Does anyone know of paper stores or bookbinding
>stores that would be good to visit?
>Mark Palkovic
>
>
>Mark Palkovic
>Head Librarian
>College-Conservatory of Music Library
>417 Blegen Library, P.O. Box 210152
>University of Cincinnati
>Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0152
>Voice: 513 556-1964
>Fax: 513 556-3777
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 11:36:19 -0800
>From:    Gerald Lange <Bieler@WORLDNET.ATT.NET>
>Subject: Wooden common presses?
>
>The following publication has an informative article containing
>numerous photographs of reconstructed historical wood common presses
>that exist in various institutions.
>
>Quaerendo
>Quarterly Journal of the Low Countries Devoted to Manuscripts and
>Printed Books"
>Volume 32, #3&4, Summer & Autumn 2002
>
>"Reconstruction of the common press: aims and results"
>Frans A Janssen
>pp 175-198
>
>>Would anyone have any photos or resources who do, of 16th-18th c. Hand =
>>Book Presses.
>>
>>We have already checked Diderot.
>>
>>
>>Best Regards,
>>
>>Dwayne Shealey
>>
>>Antiquarian Collections
>>1836 Ashley River Rd.  Suite 250
>>Charleston, SC  29407
>>PH: (843) 813-3100   FX: (843) 813-7167
>>Antiquarian@Antiquarian-Collections.com
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 14:52:37 -0500
>From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
>Subject: <No subject given>
>
>Barbara
>
>         Don't worry about it.  Fortunately, I've learned not to delete
>things too quickly.  Guess why!
>
>                 Paul
>
>RJ
>
>         It is difficult to decide on the best treatment, sight unseen.  The
>first thing is to check the grain direction of the page.  Normally the grain
>is vertical, but it is not all that unusual to find that a horizontal grain
>is used as a cost cutting measure, such as the 9" horizontal measurement
>would allow.  It is a simple matter to test for grain direction.  Lightly
>bend one of the pages halfway over; bounce your fingers along the back of
>the sheet; if the bend is against the grain, you will feel more resistance
>or spring coming from the sheet.  Since the sheets are bound into the book,
>it would not be possible to bend the sheet toward the vertical direction,
>although the grain direction can be tested by running the edge of the sheet
>between the nails of the thumb and forefinger.  If the grain is vertical,
>there will be no noticeable change.  If the grain is horizontal, however,
>there will be a pronounced rippling along the edge.  A good reason for using
>the former test to determine the grain direction.  If the grain direction is
>horizontal, then it's probably best that you get used to seeing that "1/16
>inch in the middle."
>
>         Creating a humidification chamber is relatively simple.  The most
>difficult part is deciding on the best way to proceed with a particular
>case.  The objective is to thoroughly humidify the pages of the book in a
>closed chamber, the opened book safely placed on an open grid support, such
>as, the plastic diffuser paneling for fluorescent lighting, periodically
>leafing through the book and opening to a different section of the book.
>The closed chamber can be made by simply placing a cardboard box over the
>whole thing, perhaps even covering the box with plastic sheeting.  The main
>thing is to keep the book surrounded by moist air.   Mother Nature will take
>care of the rest.
>
>         Once the book is thoroughly humidified, I recommend interleafing
>each of the 375 pages with a piece of waxed paper that has been cut to the
>same size as the page itself.  I know it's a lot of cutting, but the waxed
>paper will keep the unavoidable swell in the thickness of the book to a
>minimum.  [I recommend Reynolds Cut-Rite Wax Paper.]  Once that is done,
>place a nonabsorbent panel over the book and apply enough weight to assure
>contact pressure only.  Then wait until the book and its pages are thorough
>dry!
>
>         It's a slow drying process, but an effective one.  Once the pages
>are thoroughly humidified, they will return to their original condition.
>With the wax paper in place, only the edges of the page will dry.  As the
>edges dry, however, the remaining moisture will steadily migrate to the
>edges of the sheet, where it will evaporate, only to be replaced by the next
>in line.
>
>         Once the process is complete and the book is dry, remove the wax
>paper.  I recommend keeping the book under contact pressure for a couple of
>days, just to allow time for the book to mature in the surrounding
>environment.
>
>         It's a simple procedure.  And like most things, it takes time.  Good
>luck!
>
>                 Paul Martin
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 15:22:12 -0500
>From:    Eric Alstrom <eric.c.alstrom@DARTMOUTH.EDU>
>Subject: Re: drying books
>
>I just got back from vacation and am jumping in on this thread in the
>middle, so please pardon my confused state or if I am repeating an already
>asked question...
>
>Paul,
>
>I understand the theory of interleaving, either with waxed paper or
>absorbent towelling.  But in practice, how do you interleave between EVERY
>page in such a large book?
>
>In my experience, even interleaving every 10 pages or so creates such a
>swell that A) the book won't close in order to palce a weight on top of the
>book and B) the binding can be damaged from all the added thickness, even if
>you can get the waxed paper all the way to the spine on every page.
>
>I would like to hear how you (and others on the list) accomplish this or are
>there other methods of interleaving which binders/conservators find
>successful.
>
>Thanks,
>Eric
>
>on 3/25/03 2:52 PM, Paul D. Martin at PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:
>
>>  Once the book is thoroughly humidified, I recommend interleafing
>>  each of the 375 pages with a piece of waxed paper that has been cut to the
>>  same size as the page itself.  I know it's a lot of cutting, but the waxed
>>  paper will keep the unavoidable swell in the thickness of the book to a
>>  minimum.  [I recommend Reynolds Cut-Rite Wax Paper.]  Once that is done,
>>  place a nonabsorbent panel over the book and apply enough weight to assure
>>  contact pressure only.  Then wait until the book and its pages are thorough
>>  dry!
>
>
>*****************************************
>  Eric Alstrom      Collections Conservator
>  Dartmouth College      Hanover, NH
>  603-646-1452      eric.c.alstrom@dartmouth.edu
>  www.dartmouth.edu/~preserve/
>*****************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 16:03:50 EST
>From:    Patricia Grass <PAGrass@AOL.COM>
>Subject: Re: Asian style hand scrolls
>
>Try looking at the Dunhung Project--  go to    http://idp.bl.uk
>then click on  special topics and then Chinese Bookbinding
>
>It has great information about Chinese Bookbinding including scrolls. I made
>a "whirlwind" scroll from this page and found the information very clear and
>helpful.
>
>Patricia Grass
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 16:13:30 -0600
>From:    Duncan <tvjunkie@TVJUNKIE.NET>
>Subject: bookfilter
>
>A new site dedicated to book discussion.
>
>
>http://www.bookfilter.com
>
>
>Original link from http://www.metafilter.com
>
>
>--
>******************************************
>"I can dream about being Bugs Bunny,
>but when I wake up I'm Daffy"
>
>         - Chuck Jones
>
>
>    Duncan   http://www.campbell-logan.com
>
>         Campbell-Logan Bindery, Inc.
>               Minneapolis, MN
>******************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 15:40:34 -0800
>From:    Julia DeHoff <juliadehoff@YAHOO.COM>
>Subject: Japanese punch drill
>
>I just purchased a Japanese punch drill, but since the
>instructions are in Japanese, I thought I'd ask for
>advice.
>How much can it punch through at once?
>Do you need to clean the paper circles out of the
>drill? If so, how do you do that?
>Any guidance you can give me about how to get the best
>performance out of this tool will be greatly
>appreciated.
>If this is in the archives, what's the thread topic?
>Thanks.
>Julia in Tallahassee
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do you Yahoo!?
>Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
>http://platinum.yahoo.com
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 20:05:40 EST
>From:    Barbara Harman <ArtSurvive@AOL.COM>
>Subject: <No subject given>
>
>Hi Paul - Actually, it was the posting about PENNIES awards that I wanted. Do
>you still have that or have I sent this post to the entirely wrong person?
>It's been a loooong day! Barbara
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 20:36:34 -0500
>From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
>Subject: Re: drying books
>
>Eric,
>
>         Point well taken.  That is the difficulty of dealing with
>anything sight
>unseen.  The principle is sound; the trick is in the adaptation.  To begin
>with, for example, I would determine the maximum allowable swell and
>interleaf accordingly.  I prefer wax paper, because it is about as thin an
>insert as you can find and it is not moisture absorbent [which is why I
>favor the use of the wax paper.]  Periodically then, I would reposition the
>inserts in each subdivision or section of the book to promote an even rate
>of drying.  Variations will abound, but the principle remains the same.  It
>all depends.
>
>         Thanks for pointing that out.
>
>                 Paul
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
>[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Eric Alstrom
>Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 3:22 PM
>To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>Subject: Re: drying books
>
>
>I just got back from vacation and am jumping in on this thread in the
>middle, so please pardon my confused state or if I am repeating an already
>asked question...
>
>Paul,
>
>I understand the theory of interleaving, either with waxed paper or
>absorbent towelling.  But in practice, how do you interleave between EVERY
>page in such a large book?
>
>In my experience, even interleaving every 10 pages or so creates such a
>swell that A) the book won't close in order to palce a weight on top of the
>book and B) the binding can be damaged from all the added thickness, even if
>you can get the waxed paper all the way to the spine on every page.
>
>I would like to hear how you (and others on the list) accomplish this or are
>there other methods of interleaving which binders/conservators find
>successful.
>
>Thanks,
>Eric
>
>on 3/25/03 2:52 PM, Paul D. Martin at PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:
>
>>  Once the book is thoroughly humidified, I recommend interleafing
>>  each of the 375 pages with a piece of waxed paper that has been cut to the
>>  same size as the page itself.  I know it's a lot of cutting, but the waxed
>>  paper will keep the unavoidable swell in the thickness of the book to a
>>  minimum.  [I recommend Reynolds Cut-Rite Wax Paper.]  Once that is done,
>>  place a nonabsorbent panel over the book and apply enough weight to assure
>>  contact pressure only.  Then wait until the book and its pages are
>thorough
>>  dry!
>
>
>*****************************************
>  Eric Alstrom      Collections Conservator
>  Dartmouth College      Hanover, NH
>  603-646-1452      eric.c.alstrom@dartmouth.edu
>  www.dartmouth.edu/~preserve/
>*****************************************
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 20:46:38 -0500
>From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
>Subject: <No subject given>
>
>Hi, Barbara,
>
>          Oops!  Sorry.  I don't have.  But it was nice to meet you, anyway.
>
>                 Paul
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
>[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Barbara Harman
>Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 8:06 PM
>To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>Subject: Re:
>
>
>Hi Paul - Actually, it was the posting about PENNIES awards that I wanted.
>Do
>you still have that or have I sent this post to the entirely wrong person?
>It's been a loooong day! Barbara
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 21:01:47 -0500
>From:    "Paul D. Martin" <PaulMartin@ADELPHIA.NET>
>Subject: Re: Japanese punch drill
>
>Hi, Julia,
>
>         I'm not quite sure of what you mean by a punch drill, but if
>it is like the
>one that I have, it is just a matter of putting in the particular punch that
>you need to give you the hole that you want.  It will go through any given
>number of sheets of paper, depending on the paper that you are using.  The
>punch outs accumulate to the point, I suppose, that they come out of their
>own accord.  [I never let them accumulate to that point.]  Hope this helps.
>But it is indeed a very handy tool!
>
>         Paul in Buffalo
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
>[mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Julia DeHoff
>Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 6:41 PM
>To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>Subject: Japanese punch drill
>
>
>I just purchased a Japanese punch drill, but since the
>instructions are in Japanese, I thought I'd ask for
>advice.
>How much can it punch through at once?
>Do you need to clean the paper circles out of the
>drill? If so, how do you do that?
>Any guidance you can give me about how to get the best
>performance out of this tool will be greatly
>appreciated.
>If this is in the archives, what's the thread topic?
>Thanks.
>Julia in Tallahassee
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do you Yahoo!?
>Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
>http://platinum.yahoo.com
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date:    Tue, 25 Mar 2003 23:27:15 -0500
>From:    Terry Belanger <belanger@VIRGINIA.EDU>
>Subject: Freshest Advices: March 2003
>
>Freshest Advices: March 2003 (distributed to the Book_arts-L, ExLibris, and
>SHARP electronic bulletin boards 25 Mar 2003)
>
>New RBS Map Course. Rare Book School is pleased to announce that David
>Woodward, Arthur H. Robinson Professor of Georgraphy Emeritus at the
>University of Wisconsin, has agreed to teach an RBS course on the history
>of maps, beginning in March 2004. Woodward is the Founding Editor of The
>History of Cartography Project; see:
>
>          http://www.geography.wisc.edu/histcart/
>
>The Project is:
>a research, editorial, and publishing venture drawing international
>attention to the history of maps and mapping. The Project's major work is
>the multi-volume History of Cartography series. Its interdisciplinary
>approach brings together scholars in the arts, sciences, and humanities. By
>considering previously ignored aspects of cartographic history, the Project
>encourages a broader view of maps that has significantly influenced other
>fields of study.
>
>Woodward is the author of "Catalogue of Watermarks in Italian Maps, ca.
>1540 - 1600" (Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 1996); "The All-American Map: Wax
>Engraving and Its Influence on Cartography" (Chicago 1977); and many other
>books and articles;  he edited "Five Centuries of Map Printing" (Chicago
>1975) and "Art and Cartography: Six Historical Essays" (Chicago 1987); for
>his vita, see
>
>          http://www.geography.wisc.edu/faculty/woodward/
>
>
>Schiller Malkin Lecture. Nearly ten years ago at RBS, Justin G. Schiller
>gave the 1993 Sol. M. and Mary Ann O'Brian Malkin Lecture in Bibliography.
>His subject was the history of the antiquarian trade in collectible
>children's books. The wheels grind slowly here -- but they do move. We are
>pleased finally to announce the publication of Schiller's 48-page lecture,
>as "Pioneering Collectible Children's Books: The First One Hundred Years."
>The price of the 48-page lecture is $10. For ordering details, see
>
>          http://www.virginia.edu/oldbooks/publications.shtml
>
>Incidentally, Bernard M. Rosenthal's wonderful 1986 Malkin lecture is now
>back in print, with a new postscript: The Gentle Invasion: Continental
>Emigre Booksellers of the Thirties and Forties and Their Impact on the
>Antiquarian Booktrade in the United States.
>      Greer Allen will deliver the 2003 Sol M. and Mary Ann O'Brian Malkin
>Lecture in Bibliography at UVa on Monday, 14 July, in Room 201 Clemons
>Library. His title: "Everything I Know about Book Design I Learned at the
>Race Track."
>
>
>Books in Sheets. RBS owns seven copies of the 1691 duodecimo book, Actus
>interni virtutum ad Beatissimam Virginem Mariam (Dillingen: Joan. Casp.
>Bencard), all in flat sheets, as well as one or more copies of about two
>dozen other books in sheets. We've recently posted a fairly detailed list
>of our holdings of books in sheets on our Web site at
>http://www.virginia.edu/oldbooks/misc/misc.html
>
>We'd be very glad to know of the existence of other pre-1801 books in
>sheets, both in institutional collections and in antiquarian booksellers'
>catalogs.
>
>Terry Belanger : University Professor : University of Virginia : Rare Book
>School : 114 Alderman Library : Charlottesville, VA  22903 : Telephone
>434/924-8851   fax 434/924-8824   email belanger@virginia.edu : URL
><http://www.rarebookschool.org>
>
>------------------------------
>
>End of BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 24 Mar 2003 to 25 Mar 2003 (#2003-84)
>*****************************************************************


--

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


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