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[BKARTS] Inkjet print life



Date:    Tue, 27 May 2003 00:26:17 -0700
From:    Gerald Lange <Bieler@WORLDNET.ATT.NET>
Subject: Re: Introduction and Inkjet print life

Katie

I had a question about archival matters (in regard to something else)
and I went to the Huntington Museum and asked a conservator there. She
said, "put it in a microwave." Must be a quick and dirty way to reveal
what will eventually happen. Never actually tried it.

Hard to know if archival ink jet will last 200 years. Way back when
there was a controversy between parchment and the new upstart, paper,
there was a critical question proffered as to how long paper could
possibly last. The proposed "two hundred years?" didn't seem long enough
at the time. And some of that paper is still around.

But I have noticed that there is a yellowish transfer to the facing page
from ink jet images over a relative short period of time. This could
happen with any printing process, to some extent (depending on...), but
this may be an overlooked bit of concern.

Gerald

By "forever," I mean forty years - Mark Twain


------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 27 May 2003 01:20:38 -0700
From:    Mark Wilden <mark@MWILDEN.COM>
Subject: Re: Introduction and Inkjet print life

From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@WORLDNET.ATT.NET>
 I had a question about archival matters (in regard to something else)
 and I went to the Huntington Museum and asked a conservator there. She
 said, "put it in a microwave." Must be a quick and dirty way to reveal
 what will eventually happen. Never actually tried it.
Gosh--why not?? I just did. Wife walks in and asks what I doing. "I'm
microwaving the Epson test page". "Of course you are, dear--good-night..."

Having done so, I can report that the results proved without question that
the Windows logo as printed by my Epson will last at least 200 years (if the
Huntington conservator can be trusted).
As an allergist, I don't find this advice surprising, and would treat
it not as a test but as a treatment. Some people have acute
respiratory symptoms when exposed to fresh, but not to aged, printed
matter. I advise such patients to bake their fresh newspapers and
magazines before reading them. I have not been able to identify the
specific volatile material involved in the reaction, and am not sure
if it represents true allergy or a response of the irritated allergic
nose to non-specific volatiles, but if the ink is completely dry
before people are exposed to it the symptoms will not occur. I prefer
the oven to the microwave, as it is provided with exhaust capability
that the microwave is not. I don't know exactly how long it takes for
a treatment, but I usually advise fifteen minutes at 250 degrees. For
those who worry about fire I point out that we bake muffins at a
higher temperature than this. I would certainly think that ink dried
to the paper would retain its crisp appearance longer than damp ink
closed on itself on a folded page.

Wife walks in and asks, "Where's the newspaper?"
"It's not out of the oven yet."
                Larry

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