[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [BKARTS] BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)



In 30 years of exhibiting bookworks, I have found that the respect viewers
approach the exhibition is manifest only through the gloves situation--I
have always provided gloves with everyone of my shows and it has worked.  In
30 years, I have lost one book in the United STates and two books in
Australia and New Zealand--not a bad record.  There is that affinity to
touch with and without gloves, and with gloves, you protect the works.  Of
course, I have always had a table with those multiples which can be
replaced, yet can be perused at length with a gloved hand or two. Of course,
there are those bookworks which should never be touched--and as such I have
used a system of color codings or a way of having the gallery assistant be
asked to turn the pages for the viewer.  I also am present a great deal the
first week of any traveling show and teach the docents (students or those
volunteers who want to sit the show) the stories of each of my bookworks and
how to deal with each for the public.  AS such, it has made it much more
secure for me to leave and know that the show is in "good  hands" to turn a
phrase.  I have been successful in traveling shows because I usually go with
the show, install it, and then interpret it and then teach those who are
securing the gallery how to interpret the show in their own way as well.
Respect is built in in that way.

Barbara Metz has also perfect the way of installing the show by doing a
CD-Rom to show those who will install the show without her to do so the
correct way.  CDs are wonderful for a great many reasons.  I do recall the
Vollard show at MOMA in 1977 when they used videos to turn the pages of
those precious books which could not be touched by anyone, but where each
and every page of those magnificent books were turned on monitors for people
to appreciate.  Then too, those huge bookworks of Ansel  Kiefer were turned
by gorgeous turners in every show they appeared--from MOCA in Los Angeles to
everywhere else.  Respect is instilled by such motives.  Not bad for a day's
work, but it works.

Judith A. Hoffberg
Judith A. Hoffberg
Umbrella
P.O. Box 3640
Santa Monica, CA 90408
http://colophon.com/journal
http://colophon.com/ediblebooks/books2eat2003.html
(310)399-1146, fax: 399-5070
Let a smile be your umbrella!
----- Original Message -----
From: "Automatic digest processor" <LISTSERV@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: "Recipients of BOOK_ARTS-L digests" <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2003 9:01 PM
Subject: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)


> There are 14 messages totalling 863 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. The Center for Book Arts
>   2. Hand Bookbinders of California 31st Members' Exhibit Now Online
>   3. Open book... (3)
>   4. New England Lecture and Seminar
>   5. Open book... ways to display and experience the works ... (3)
>   6. ICOM-CC-Wood, Furniture and Lacquer NEWSLETTER.
>   7. Paper the Art and the craft
>   8. Etymology of the term "Three-piece binding"
>   9. A recommendation
>  10. Author Artifact Auction on ebay - unique purpose - unique items
>
>              ***********************************************
>         See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>      *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
>      consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 07:39:46 -0500
> From:    Richard Minsky <minsky@xxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: The Center for Book Arts
>
> Please help the Center for Book Arts to continue providing outstanding
> exhibitions, classes, workshops, studio space, artist-in-residence
programs
> and publications. The annual end-of-year campaign is underway. Details are
> at
> http://centerforbookarts.org/eoy-2003.htm
>
> Contributions can be made online by credit card
> on the phone at 212 481-0295
> or by mailing your check to
>
> The Center for Book Arts
> 28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
> New York, NY  10001
>
> Center for Book Arts, Incorporated 1974 is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit
> organization.
> Contributions are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.
>
> --
>  Richard
>  http://minsky.com
>  http://www.centerforbookarts.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 08:38:13 -0500
> From:    "Peter D. Verheyen" <verheyen@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Hand Bookbinders of California 31st Members' Exhibit Now Online
>
> The fully illustrated Web catalog of Hand Bookbinders of California 31st
> Members' Exhibit is now online at:
<http://www.philobiblon.com/hbc31st.htm>.
>
> If you're in the San Francisco Bay Area and looking for an exciting
bookish
> event the exhibit is on display at at Thomas A. Goldwasser Rare Books
> through December 27, 2003. A map, directions, and regular viewing hours
can
> be found at <http://www.philobiblon.com/hbc31st>.
>
> The exhibit features the work of:
>
> Jane Aaron, Patrice Baldwin, Nancy Bloch, Patricia Bolt, Carolee Campbell,
> Heidi Ferrini, Patricia Galante, Steve Heimerle, Signa I. Houghteling,
> Constance Hunter, Mary Laird, Hisako Nakazawa, Joanne Page, Robert S.
> Rosenzweig, Lily Stevenson, Carla J. Tenret, Peter & Donna Thomas, Peter
D.
> Verheyen, Pamela S. Wood, and Constance Wozny.
>
> If you are in the area, please take the opportunity to view this fine
> exhibition of book works, or stop by via the web.
>
> Peter Verheyen
>
> __________________________________
>
> Peter D. Verheyen
> Bookbinder & Conservator
> <verheyen@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> The Book Arts Web & Book_Arts-L Listserv
> <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 09:44:13 -0800
> From:    RLavadour <paper@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Open book...
>
> I've been mulling this around since seeing the call for entries for "An
Open
> Book" and thought I'd toss it out for discussion.
>
> For those that missed the call, the organizers have adopted a creative
> approach to the problem of displaying books.
>
> From the prospectus: "...One of the major problems with showing books in
an
> exhibition is that too often the books are shown under glass, closed up so
> that just the cover is exposed or one page of a book is displayed. Think
> about how your book is to be displayed. One of the most accessible book
> forms is the accordion fold but there are many other forms that can be
> displayed so that a book can be seen in its entirety when displayed in a
> case or on a pedestal..."
>
> Let me say from the beginning that I applaud the organizers for
confronting
> this issue and for instigating a discussion on the nature of book arts
> exhibit.
>
> It also opens the door to lots of other questions.
>
> One of the things that compells me to make books is the way the element of
> time is involved. When you experience a book, there is often a moment(s)
of
> discovery that occurs in due time, and if the book is particularly
> successful, you are compelled to return to that experience over and over
> again. Other books rely on the fact that all the visual information can't
be
> taken in at one sitting and demand long, repeated visits.
>
> The other element that I love about books is their tactile quality. It's a
> thrill to see someone pick up your work and move their hands in a way that
> shows they're taking in information through their skin that will add to
the
> experience.
>
> The turning of a "page" (which can be interpreted as broadly as possible)
> plays into all the above.
>
> In my version of a perfect world, books would be exhibited in a large room
> full of comfortable sitting areas and visitors with clean hands and basic
> knowledge about how to handle the materials. A place where a market for
book
> arts could be expanded by socializing people into the richly satisfying
> elements of time and touch that separate books from paintings, prints and
> sculpture - a place of active participation.
>
> In the real world, this would entail sometimes elaborate and impractical
> things like asking artists to submit an extra "exhibition copy", making
> facimilies (like the Russian Avant-Garde books at MOMA last year), dealing
> with damage and theft, etc. While many exhibits are successfully adopting
a
> "hands-on" approach, I suspect it's more geared toward lower-priced work.
>
> Another alternative being used is employing a second media in an attempt
to
> virtually communicate the qualities of the book. At the Bibliocosmos
exhibit
> at Reed College in Portland this summer, a book that consisted of text
that
> was watermarked on each page was displayed in a case and an image of an
> illuminated page was viewed on an adjacent video monitor.
>
> In attempting to grow the market for book arts within the mainstream
gallery
> and collector community and with the general public (as opposed to simply
> other book artists), do we make things as easy as possible for the viewer,
> making touch and time secondary? Would an accordion folded page, printed
on
> one side, be more suited to being displayed on a wall as a print, the way
> Enrique Chagoya presents some of his "codices"? Do we submit work to wear,
> tear, theft, etc. to get it into the hands of the potential collector?
What
> about one-of-a-kind work? Or does an "open book" concept allow for a
glimpse
> into book arts that will compell viewers to treat their future encounters
> with artist's books differently, and entice them to take the time to
explore
> the work more thoroughly?
>
> I'd be very interested in hearing other people's thoughts.
>
> Roberta
> -------------------------------------------------------
> Roberta Lavadour
> Mission Creek Press / Pendleton, Oregon
> http://www.missioncreekpress.com/newwork.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 13:28:33 -0500
> From:    Jeffrey Altepeter <jeff@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: New England Lecture and Seminar
>
> The New England Chapter of The Guild of Book Workers invites you to a =
> two part program with Dr. John Sharpe to be held at Harvard University =
> in Cambridge, MA.  The lecture, on December 12, 2003, is free and open =
> to the public.  Registration and a $125 fee is required for the hands-on =
> seminar to be held the following day.  Please read on for more =
> information.
>
> Lecture and Seminar:
> The Development of the Early Codex=20
> with Dr. John L. Sharpe=20
> Harvard, University=20
> Cambridge, MA=20
> 12, 13 December 2003
>
> The New England Chapter is very pleased to announce a two part program =
> on the history and development of the early codex with Dr. John Sharpe, =
> one of the foremost authorities on early book materials and structures.
>
> In 1980 Dr. Sharpe commenced a study of Coptic bindings, and this =
> continued in the form of a survey of all binding materials that have =
> survived from before the end of the first millennium of the Common Era.  =
> He has been preparing a revision of Theodore Petersen's Catalogue of =
> Coptic Bindings in the Morgan Library.  These Coptic bindings include =
> the Hamouli collection, one of the largest groups of early Coptic =
> bindings ever recovered.  The Catalogue, augmented by Dr. Sharpe with an =
> examination of the important findings since Petersen concluded his work =
> in the 1950's, will present the preserved witness to how the book was =
> made when the codex finally supplanted the roll as the accepted format =
> for publication.
>
> On the evening of Friday, December 12th, at 7pm in the Langdell North =
> classroom at Harvard University, Dr. Sharpe will present a lecture on =
> this subject. He will discuss the Coptic binding evidence and the =
> ramifications and theories that these binding materials prompt. This =
> lecture will act as an introduction to the Saturday seminar.  This =
> lecture is free and open to the public.
>
> On Saturday, December 13th, from 9-5 in the Lamont Forum Room at Harvard =
> University, Dr, Sharpe will hold a seminar on the transition from Coptic =
> binding styles to Byzantine, Islamic and Ethiopic binding styles.  This =
> seminar will involve the examination of relevant materials and bindings =
> from the Houghton Library's collection.  It will act as a kind of =
> practicum to the lecture's introduction and theory.  The fee for =
> participation in the seminar is $125.  Space is limited.
>
> Dr. Sharpe studied at Wofford College, Duke University, St. Andrews =
> University (Scotland), Friederich Alexander University (Erlangen, =
> Germany), and Cambridge University.  He spent one year as visiting =
> scholar at Oxford University.  He was curator of Rare Books at Duke =
> University, and later, Academic Librarian for Research Affairs.  He =
> spent years researching in Patmos at the library of the Monastery of St. =
> John, examining and recording those codices with Byzantine bindings.  =
> Dr. Sharpe co-edited and contributed to Roger Powell: The Compleat =
> Binder.  He retired from Duke in January 1998, and since then has been =
> working as a researcher, writer, consultant and appraiser of books and =
> manuscripts with his own company: CPRM, Inc.--Cultural Properties and =
> Resources Management, Inc.
>
> If you would like to register for the seminar send a check for $125, =
> made out to the New England Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers, to =
> Barry Spence, Events Chair, 3 Masonic Ave, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370.
>
> If you have questions about either of these events, please contact Barry =
> at bspence@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, or 413-625-2980.
>
> A map showing the location of  the Langdell North Classroom at the =
> Harvard Law Library is available on the New England Chapter website:  =
> http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byorg/gbw/chapters/newengland/index.shtml.=
>
>
> General directions to the law library may be found on their website at =
> http://www.law.harvard.edu.
>
> Directions to Lamont Library at Harvard University: =
> http://hcl.harvard.edu/lamont/about/directn.html.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 11:11:18 -0800
> From:    Laurie Mullikin <laurie.mullikin@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: Open book... ways to display and experience the works ...
>
> My first experience with  book arts  had  aspects of what Roberta
describes
> and it was an awesome introduction to the art form. On the closing day of
> the  Los Angeles Book Arts Center's first exhibit, the creator of  "Thirty
> books in 30 days" (there with family and friends) took down each work from
> it's individual protected case on the wall and paged through most
explaining
> her inspiration for it, choice of media, etc. ... and allowing some to be
> passed around. It was the difference between viewing duck under glass and
> eating the duck.
>
> A few quick thoughts that don't come close to addressing Roberta's wishes,
> but would allow a little more viewing in the current context of many book
> exhibits ...
>
> - create a limited number of special "tours" where exhibit personnel are
> authorized to take the book out of it's protective shield and show tour
> members more of the book ... maybe a fund raise with extra charge??
>
> - Stand up books  under glass on a  turnstile/lazy susan mechanism so at
> least front, back and a few inside sections can be seen.
>
> - Mirrored backdrop for books on display for similar effect as above. Has
> anybody seen a mirrored folding screen which could be used for this?
>
> -photocopy of key parts of the book (either bound or sequentially
displayed
> on the wall ) that accompanies the real thing under glass. Creating such
an
> "exhibit supplement" to the book might also inspire artists to include
> background on the inspiration, choice of media, etc.
>
> I'm interested in  thoughts and experiences of others re Roberta's post.
>
> Laurie
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "RLavadour" <paper@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2003 9:44 AM
> Subject: Open book...
>
>
> > I've been mulling this around since seeing the call for entries for "An
> Open
> > Book" and thought I'd toss it out for discussion.
> >
> > For those that missed the call, the organizers have adopted a creative
> > approach to the problem of displaying books.
> >
> > From the prospectus: "...One of the major problems with showing books in
> an
> > exhibition is that too often the books are shown under glass, closed up
so
> > that just the cover is exposed or one page of a book is displayed. Think
> > about how your book is to be displayed. One of the most accessible book
> > forms is the accordion fold but there are many other forms that can be
> > displayed so that a book can be seen in its entirety when displayed in a
> > case or on a pedestal..."
> >
> > Let me say from the beginning that I applaud the organizers for
> confronting
> > this issue and for instigating a discussion on the nature of book arts
> > exhibit.
> >
> > It also opens the door to lots of other questions.
> >
> > One of the things that compells me to make books is the way the element
of
> > time is involved. When you experience a book, there is often a moment(s)
> of
> > discovery that occurs in due time, and if the book is particularly
> > successful, you are compelled to return to that experience over and over
> > again. Other books rely on the fact that all the visual information
can't
> be
> > taken in at one sitting and demand long, repeated visits.
> >
> > The other element that I love about books is their tactile quality. It's
a
> > thrill to see someone pick up your work and move their hands in a way
that
> > shows they're taking in information through their skin that will add to
> the
> > experience.
> >
> > The turning of a "page" (which can be interpreted as broadly as
possible)
> > plays into all the above.
> >
> > In my version of a perfect world, books would be exhibited in a large
room
> > full of comfortable sitting areas and visitors with clean hands and
basic
> > knowledge about how to handle the materials. A place where a market for
> book
> > arts could be expanded by socializing people into the richly satisfying
> > elements of time and touch that separate books from paintings, prints
and
> > sculpture - a place of active participation.
> >
> > In the real world, this would entail sometimes elaborate and impractical
> > things like asking artists to submit an extra "exhibition copy", making
> > facimilies (like the Russian Avant-Garde books at MOMA last year),
dealing
> > with damage and theft, etc. While many exhibits are successfully
adopting
> a
> > "hands-on" approach, I suspect it's more geared toward lower-priced
work.
> >
> > Another alternative being used is employing a second media in an attempt
> to
> > virtually communicate the qualities of the book. At the Bibliocosmos
> exhibit
> > at Reed College in Portland this summer, a book that consisted of text
> that
> > was watermarked on each page was displayed in a case and an image of an
> > illuminated page was viewed on an adjacent video monitor.
> >
> > In attempting to grow the market for book arts within the mainstream
> gallery
> > and collector community and with the general public (as opposed to
simply
> > other book artists), do we make things as easy as possible for the
viewer,
> > making touch and time secondary? Would an accordion folded page, printed
> on
> > one side, be more suited to being displayed on a wall as a print, the
way
> > Enrique Chagoya presents some of his "codices"? Do we submit work to
wear,
> > tear, theft, etc. to get it into the hands of the potential collector?
> What
> > about one-of-a-kind work? Or does an "open book" concept allow for a
> glimpse
> > into book arts that will compell viewers to treat their future
encounters
> > with artist's books differently, and entice them to take the time to
> explore
> > the work more thoroughly?
> >
> > I'd be very interested in hearing other people's thoughts.
> >
> > Roberta
> > -------------------------------------------------------
> > Roberta Lavadour
> > Mission Creek Press / Pendleton, Oregon
> > http://www.missioncreekpress.com/newwork.htm
> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >         See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >
> >      *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
> >      consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*
> >
> >         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
> >                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
> >              ***********************************************
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 11:58:33 -0800
> From:    Signa Houghteling <judy@xxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: Open book... ways to display and experience the works ...
>
> And here is another thought or two on the subject of exhibiting books.
>
> Judy Houghteling
> Hand Bookbinders of California
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of
> Laurie Mullikin
> Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2003 11:11 AM
> To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: Re: Open book... ways to display and experience the works ...
>
>
> My first experience with  book arts  had  aspects of what Roberta
describes
> and it was an awesome introduction to the art form. On the closing day of
> the  Los Angeles Book Arts Center's first exhibit, the creator of  "Thirty
> books in 30 days" (there with family and friends) took down each work from
> it's individual protected case on the wall and paged through most
explaining
> her inspiration for it, choice of media, etc. ... and allowing some to be
> passed around. It was the difference between viewing duck under glass and
> eating the duck.
>
> A few quick thoughts that don't come close to addressing Roberta's wishes,
> but would allow a little more viewing in the current context of many book
> exhibits ...
>
> - create a limited number of special "tours" where exhibit personnel are
> authorized to take the book out of it's protective shield and show tour
> members more of the book ... maybe a fund raise with extra charge??
>
> - Stand up books  under glass on a  turnstile/lazy susan mechanism so at
> least front, back and a few inside sections can be seen.
>
> - Mirrored backdrop for books on display for similar effect as above. Has
> anybody seen a mirrored folding screen which could be used for this?
>
> -photocopy of key parts of the book (either bound or sequentially
displayed
> on the wall ) that accompanies the real thing under glass. Creating such
an
> "exhibit supplement" to the book might also inspire artists to include
> background on the inspiration, choice of media, etc.
>
> I'm interested in  thoughts and experiences of others re Roberta's post.
>
> Laurie
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "RLavadour" <paper@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2003 9:44 AM
> Subject: Open book...
>
>
> > I've been mulling this around since seeing the call for entries for "An
> Open
> > Book" and thought I'd toss it out for discussion.
> >
> > For those that missed the call, the organizers have adopted a creative
> > approach to the problem of displaying books.
> >
> > From the prospectus: "...One of the major problems with showing books in
> an
> > exhibition is that too often the books are shown under glass, closed up
so
> > that just the cover is exposed or one page of a book is displayed. Think
> > about how your book is to be displayed. One of the most accessible book
> > forms is the accordion fold but there are many other forms that can be
> > displayed so that a book can be seen in its entirety when displayed in a
> > case or on a pedestal..."
> >
> > Let me say from the beginning that I applaud the organizers for
> confronting
> > this issue and for instigating a discussion on the nature of book arts
> > exhibit.
> >
> > It also opens the door to lots of other questions.
> >
> > One of the things that compells me to make books is the way the element
of
> > time is involved. When you experience a book, there is often a moment(s)
> of
> > discovery that occurs in due time, and if the book is particularly
> > successful, you are compelled to return to that experience over and over
> > again. Other books rely on the fact that all the visual information
can't
> be
> > taken in at one sitting and demand long, repeated visits.
> >
> > The other element that I love about books is their tactile quality. It's
a
> > thrill to see someone pick up your work and move their hands in a way
that
> > shows they're taking in information through their skin that will add to
> the
> > experience.
> >
> > The turning of a "page" (which can be interpreted as broadly as
possible)
> > plays into all the above.
> >
> > In my version of a perfect world, books would be exhibited in a large
room
> > full of comfortable sitting areas and visitors with clean hands and
basic
> > knowledge about how to handle the materials. A place where a market for
> book
> > arts could be expanded by socializing people into the richly satisfying
> > elements of time and touch that separate books from paintings, prints
and
> > sculpture - a place of active participation.
> >
> > In the real world, this would entail sometimes elaborate and impractical
> > things like asking artists to submit an extra "exhibition copy", making
> > facimilies (like the Russian Avant-Garde books at MOMA last year),
dealing
> > with damage and theft, etc. While many exhibits are successfully
adopting
> a
> > "hands-on" approach, I suspect it's more geared toward lower-priced
work.
> >
> > Another alternative being used is employing a second media in an attempt
> to
> > virtually communicate the qualities of the book. At the Bibliocosmos
> exhibit
> > at Reed College in Portland this summer, a book that consisted of text
> that
> > was watermarked on each page was displayed in a case and an image of an
> > illuminated page was viewed on an adjacent video monitor.
> >
> > In attempting to grow the market for book arts within the mainstream
> gallery
> > and collector community and with the general public (as opposed to
simply
> > other book artists), do we make things as easy as possible for the
viewer,
> > making touch and time secondary? Would an accordion folded page, printed
> on
> > one side, be more suited to being displayed on a wall as a print, the
way
> > Enrique Chagoya presents some of his "codices"? Do we submit work to
wear,
> > tear, theft, etc. to get it into the hands of the potential collector?
> What
> > about one-of-a-kind work? Or does an "open book" concept allow for a
> glimpse
> > into book arts that will compell viewers to treat their future
encounters
> > with artist's books differently, and entice them to take the time to
> explore
> > the work more thoroughly?
> >
> > I'd be very interested in hearing other people's thoughts.
> >
> > Roberta
> > -------------------------------------------------------
> > Roberta Lavadour
> > Mission Creek Press / Pendleton, Oregon
> > http://www.missioncreekpress.com/newwork.htm
> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >         See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >
> >      *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
> >      consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*
> >
> >         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
> >                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
> >              ***********************************************
>
>              ***********************************************
>         See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>      *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
>      consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 14:02:01 -0700
> From:    Tom Trusky <TTRUSKY@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: Open book...
>
> Hi, Roberta,
>
> Thought I'd share with you some display experiences I've had with
> "Booker's Dozen," the biennial, juried, traveling book show sponsored by
> the Idaho Center for the Book.  "Booker's" travels to twelve venues in
> Idaho throughout the calendar year and consists of fourteen artists'
> books made by Idahoans.
>
> Sharing your belief that books are meant to be handled,
> experienced-in-time, etc., I have in the past, with consent of the book
> makers, advised host institutions that they might allow
> patrons/viewers/readers to "work" books on display--sometimes gloved,
> sometimes with bare, nekkid hands--but always under supervision.  One
> year I advised book artists that their books could not be pheasants
> under glass; works had to be pawable, manipulatable, toyed with--yea,
> even read.
>
> The results of both approachs?  The under supervision approach resulted
> in the repair of two books and the replacement of a third.  The
> not-under-glass approach resulted in the repair of two books and the
> theft of a third ("The Survivalist's Cookbook"...).  Luckily, the latter
> had been done in an edition and could be replaced.
>
> For the forthcoming Booker's (2004) I have again sought permission from
> book makers to allow the public to handle books under supervision.
> However, because many of the venues do not have staff to serve as Biblio
> Police (and fiscal constraints make such staffing even more problematic
> in these post 9/11 days), I have also scanned and/or photographed every
> danged page on every danged book in the forthcoming exhibit and a
> "Booker's 2004 CD" will accompany the exhibit, for viewing by them who
> want or can.  (As well, I'm giving all bookers in the exhibit a free
> copy of the disk.)
>
> Electronic access is in many ways an unsatisfying substitute for Real
> Biblio Time, of course, but at least readers will be able to see what
> the heck is going on on p. 17--and not just the cover or that spread on
> pp. 28-29.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Tom Trusky, Director
> Hemingway Western Studies Center and
> Professor of English
> Boise State University
> 1910 University Drive
> Boise, ID  83725
> USA
> (208) 426-1999 tel
> (208) 426-4373 fax
> ttrusky@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> http://english.boisestate.edu/ttrusky
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 21:31:29 +0000
> From:    hany hanna aziz hanna <hhnnc@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: ICOM-CC-Wood, Furniture and Lacquer NEWSLETTER.
>
> Dear colleges
> Greetings,
> Please find attached the ICOM-CC-Wood, Furniture and Lacquer
(ICOM-CC-W.F&L)
> NEWSLETTER.
> With my best wishes
> Yours,
>
> Dr.(Mr.) / Hany Hanna (Ph.D.)
> Chair, ICOM-CC-Wood, Furniture, Lacquer and related materials.
> Senior Conservator, Head of Department of Wood conservation, Supreme
Council
> of Antiquities (SCA), EGYPT.
> Mobile : +2 - 012 - 4176742
> Tel. No.: +2 - 02 - 4234474
> Fax. No.: +2 - 02 - 4251411
> Postal Address:
> 8 Sayed Darwish St., El-Kousaiareen, Cairo, Egypt (11291).
>
> =================== This email is confidential and solely intended for the
> recipient(s) to whom it is addressed. If you have received this email in
> error, please reply to the sender of this email advising this error.
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection service: 2 months FREE*
> http://join.msn.com/?page=features/virus
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 18:05:32 EST
> From:    Louise Neaderland <Isca4art2B@xxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: Open book...
>
> Tom- The CD sounds like a really good compromise to me. I'll be curating
an
> ISCA traveling exhibitionof artists books later this year and willseriosly
> consider creating a CD to travel with it.
> Louise Neaderland
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 19:28:48 -0500
> From:    Liliana <ilelal@xxxxxxx>
> Subject: Paper the Art and the craft
>
> The opening of the show featuring well know artists working with paper =
> and artist books like Peter & Donna Thomas, Daniel Kelm, Robbin =
> Silverberg, Judy Hoffman, Susan Gaylord and our RI dedicated artists Ann =
> Grasso, Kathleen Hancock,Walter Feldman and Liliana Fijman went very =
> well. Thanks to all who came to visit and made possible  an afternoon =
> full of good energy and conversation. Thanks to those of you on the list =
> that responded to the first posting.  As a curator of this project I am =
> most satisfied with the response from the public that was invited to =
> participate in a series of workshops related to the exhibition. I will =
> be posting more on the subject. Happy pulping and all things paper.  PS =
> a quote from Henri Matisse that one of our very thoughtful artists =
> brought to the opening: " "...success is prison, and the artist must =
> never be a prisoner of himself, prisoner  of style, prisoner of =
> reputation, prisoner of success, etc. Did not the Goncourt brothers =
> write that Japanese artists of the great period changed their names =
> several times during their lives? This pleases me: they wanted to =
> protect their freedom" =20
> It pleases me too. I feel free from highs and lows, just great =
> satisfaction. smiles to all who are reading.  Liliana
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 20:31:57 -0500
> From:    Alan Shalette <AlShal@xxxxxxx>
> Subject: Etymology of the term "Three-piece binding"
>
> I notice frequent use of the term "three-piece binding"
> in Web exhibition notes but have not been able to
> find the term in print with the exception of Henry Morris's
> "Printed Paste-papers for Three Piece Bookbindings"
> Newtown: Bird & Bull Press (1990?).
>
> The term appears to be used as an alternative to
> "quarter-bound" / "quarter-binding".
>
> Is the term "three-piece" a colloquialism or anchored
> in a recognized authority?
>
> Alan Shalette
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 21:50:15 -0500
> From:    Barbara Lazarus Metz <b-lazmet@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: Open book... ways to display and experience the works ...
>
> Hi: Just wanted to make a few comments on hands-on exhibits.
>
> In 30 years of curating, organizing and exhibiting I have run into
> this problem many times.  As Roberta says one of the joys of making
> books is watching someone read them, seeing their mind, eyes, fingers
> move from  page to page as they experience what you have done. And as
> a viewer it is  nice to  have that opportunity. But of course this is
> not possible many times with one of a kind books  or very small
> editioned and expensive work. I believe it is important for viewers
> to have that experience and so have tried to present hands-on  books
> when ever I have done an exhibition.
>
> In an exhibit I did for De Paul University, I set aside an area
> furnished with chairs and tables for visitors to sit and read. Books
> were specifically chosen for this area that were editioned and were
> purchased from the artists.
>
> An exhibit Artist Book Works, (I was Co-founder & Director) did for
> the state of Illinois Building gallery included pedistals with
> editioned works attached with wire.  Again purchased from the
> artists.  That show traveled for a couple of years and many of the
> works were badly worn, but we had replacements. It was at the
> Cultural Center here and seen by thousands.  I think people do
> respect books and try to treat them well, but the natural wear and
> tear can't be avoided.  At least by purchasing the work, the artist
> benefits as well as the viewers.
>
> For one of the exhibits I did at the Columbia College Book and Paper
> Center (ABW merged with Paper Press & Columbia in 1994) we had a
> mechanical contraption that turned the pages.  It was only OK and
> needed to be fixed a lot  as I remember.  At MOMA a number of years
> ago, in the "A Century of Artists Books" exhibition, there was a
> black box like a kiosk that you stood in front of and inside a video,
> I think, showed the Matisse Jazz book at eye level as if your hand
> was turning the pages. I can't remember if you moved a lever. Anyone
> remember that? It was a good way to experience a book without
> actually touching it cause you could get into the rhythm and the flow
> of the work.
>
> Of course, now you can get famous books on CD's that give you the
> ability to move from page to page, to zoom in, get more data and on
> and on. I think one company is Octavia or similar. I saw a demo at a
> conference some  years ago. I'm sure we will be doing more of this
> electronically as time goes on.
>
> Sorry to be so long winded, but I believe this is an important topic
> to be discussed.
>
> Best            Barbara
>
>
>
>
> .
> --
> Barbara Lazarus Metz
>
> b-lazarmetz@xxxxxxx
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 23:29:35 EST
> From:    Barbara Harman <ArtSurvive@xxxxxxx>
> Subject: A recommendation
>
> Hi everyone. I had an incredible experience tonight and wanted to share
it,
> in case any of you have opportunity in the future to see the same dance
> company. Cloud Gate performed a piece called Cursive, that I think would
appeal to
> any bookmaker, calligrapher, tai chi practitioner, dance lover, theater
lover or
> music lover (have I missed anyone - yes, you too).
>
> The combination of the dancers, the lighting design, and the music was
> nothing short of perfect. Dancers use their bodies to imitate and recreate
Chinese
> calligraphic marks and gestures, at the same time that the lighting
creates
> single pages, overlapping pages, scrolls unrolled on the stage itself and
scrims
> behind the stage are illuminated with calligraphy. The music is entirely
cello
> and percussion and also upholds, illuminates, underscores and supports the
> dancers' movements. For anyone familiar with tai chi and martial arts,
there is
> such focus and control and so much evidence of breath to support the
movements
> that you sit on the edge of your seat and breathe with the dancers,
> remembering all the things your tai chi master taught you and wondering
why (perhaps)
> you have let that activity lapse when it feels so wonderful. There were so
many
> references to pages, books, writing, the focused attention required of
those
> who make art (of any kind), that I was entralled and energized. There is a
> segment when all of the male dancers are on stage. the lighting consists
of a
> page of Chinese calligaphy which (if you are Chinese) is readable on the
back
> scrim and flows, unreadably, onto the stage itself. The dancers move
through this
> white on black calligraphy, their bodies only illuminated when they are
> within the calligraphic marks.
>
> Sorry to go on and on and I hope your interest is excited and you do seek
> them out if they are ever appearing near where you are. I wish very much
they
> were going to be here in Minneapolis at least one more day, as I would
tell
> everyone (certainly every bookmaker, calligrapher, writer, dancer,
musician and tai
> chi practitioner) I know to please, please go see them. Barbara Harman
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 15 Nov 2003 22:59:05 -0600
> From:    Kathleen Gonzalez <booksmaps@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Author Artifact Auction on ebay - unique purpose - unique items
>
> Ruminator Books in St. Paul, MN is trying some unusual tactics to stay
open
> as an independent bookstore.  One is an Author Artifact Auction which
> started today on ebay.  They solicited donations from a number of authors
> and the offerings are more than your typical signed first edition
> book.  There are broadsides, small press limited editions, special
> bindings, original art, glasses, a flag, and more.  The auction ends
> November 19.  Eco, Bass, Gaiman,  Banks, Steadman,  Morrison,  Benitez,
> Wolff,  Hampl, Erdrich,  Franzen, Giovanni.....
>
>
>
> Kathleen Gonzalez
> Books Maps Prints More
> Minneapolis, MN
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)
> ******************************************************************
>

             ***********************************************
        See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>

     *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
     consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]