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Re: [BKARTS] CD-R longevity and recording techniques for archival recordings



There's quite a number of pieces involved, all of which need to be retained in order to read digital files XX years in the future:
- longevity of the media (degradation of the magnetic or optical bits on the floppy disk, CDROM, or tape, etc.)
- availability of the reader (e.g. proper size disk drive)
- availability of other hardware (e.g. the computer to which the disk drive is attached, video monitor, printer)
- availability of software drivers specific for the reader/disk drive and for the operating system
- availability of operating system for the computer
- availability of software application matching the format of the digital file (e.g. the word processing or graphics program)


Essentially, you've got to either a) migrate all of your data to new systems every 3-5 years, or b) archive the entire system (all of the above pieces of hardware and software) used to read the files.

So even if the Kodak CDROM lasts a few hundred years, you've still got to save all of the other pieces of the system.

That's why I like books :-)

(And Peter's right, this has been discussed before.)

-Karl


On Wednesday, January 21, 2004, at 04:38 PM, Alan Shalette wrote:


I wonder if technology able to read archivally stored
data will be available as long as the media and data are.

Since my first PC in 1981, I've seen the ability to
easily obtain & read two types of floppy disks and
three types of backup tapes disappear. I still have
the media volumes, but reading them is all but hopeless
without very expensive data recovery consultant help.

Alan Shalette
Albuquerque




----- Original Message -----
From: "Gavin Stairs" <stairs@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2004 10:25 AM
Subject: CD-R longevity and recording techniques for archival recordings



| | This inquiry is a bit off topic for this list, but I imagine several of you| | have experience in the matter, especially those who are librarians. I am | in the situation of recording cd-r images of a hard disk for deposit in a | university archive, and I wonder what the latest information is on | longevity and recording techniques. Is the general recommendation still | the gold disks? Any brand preferences? Does recording speed have an | effect? What lifetimes in controlled storage are to be expected? Are | there studies available on the web?

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-Karl
=================================================================
Karl F. Best             "Each in his own way imagines Paradise;
karl@xxxxxxxxxxxx        since childhood I have envisioned it as
Chelmsford, MA           a library."  - J.L. Borges

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    *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
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