[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [BKARTS] Traditional bookbinding [inkjet]



I answered this not too long ago, but it must
have been offline instead replying to the list.

The only restrinction on material for large format Epson Inkjets
is the width and the thickness.

Since the paper path is straight, without bends,
rigid materials such as metal, wood and plastic
will go through without problem,
so long as they are within the thickness tolerance.

Non porous material such as metal
can be coated with JetCoat, which is the coating for InkJets.
JetCoat can be applied by hand with a rod and wire.
It is, however, quite expensive.

Any other material, such as cloth or paper can also
be coated with JetCoat. Very floppy material
such as cloth or linen often needs to be made more
rigid by backing it with paper.
You can buy some linen with paper backing
from binding supply houses.

As for wood, such as paper veneer, I have printed on it
without coating and also with lacquer.
One cheap method is AquaNet hair spray.

I have also printed on sandpaper.
I did not coat it, and it took numerous experiments
with different images applied to different colors of sandpaper
before I got to a satisfactory result.

It was an image of stone for a project about stone.
So sandpaper gave it the proper stone like feel.

bon chance

michael




----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Witte" <scott@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 10:53 AM
Subject: Re: Traditional bookbinding [inkjet]


> Buck wrote:
>
> >>OK, now I'm curious. How on earth do you use an ink jet to print
> >>on rigid materials like wood and metal?
>
> If a printer can print directly onto a CD, as several can, it should be
> able to print to other inflexible media. However, that doesn't mean the
> media, especially an non-porous glossy one like metal, will take the wet
> ink all that well.  Alternatively, printing to a transfer paper in any
> printer then ironing it to the wood or metal or whatever should work.
>
> --
> Scott Witte
> ---------------------------------
> WITTE ON LOCATION
> 414.345.9660
> www.scottwitte.com <http://www.scottwitte.com>
>
> Member, APA | Midwest
>
>              ***********************************************
>         See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>      *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
>      consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
        See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>

     *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
     consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]