[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [BKARTS] pressing tins



Pressing tins are useful for many purposes.

1.  Stainless steel tins (heated or not) on moist leather in a press = very
smooth finish--this is called "plating," sort of the opposite of
"embossing."
Thin leather treated this way produces smooth leather for onlays or inlays.
2.  Tins inserted into the text on one or both sides of a page that needs to
dry after pasting, repair, etc., lined with Remay to allow air circulation,
and under weight, will produce a nice, flat result.
3.  If, heaven ofrfend, your beautiful binding is a little out of square,
tins inserted on both sides of the text block, and set in the press for
awhile, can possibly correct the problem.
4.  I use galvanized tins to insert into the text when I need to trim pages.
These are inexpensive, very thin and can be cut on with an X-Acto or
scalpel.
4.  I can't think of any more right now, but it's been a long, hard day.

Good luck!

Signa Houghteling

-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of Liz
Horton
Sent: Friday, May 07, 2004 4:31 PM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: pressing tins


(Silly questions department): What are pressing tins?

             ***********************************************
        See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>

     *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
     consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
        See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>

     *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
     consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & ©*

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]