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Re: [BKARTS] creating bookcloth



... almost ANY fabric can be turned into bookcloth  with the traditional
Japanese method of pasting it out with a thin flexible Japanese paper...

Yeah, my original experiments were on my mother's gaudy purple flower tea
towel sets. Now I've gone on to dad's ugly tie collection. Hmmm...perhaps
his plaid shirts are next.

Beware the beginning artist!

RA

----- Original Message -----
From: "quilter@xxxxxxxxxxxx" <quilter@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, May 22, 2004 8:05 AM
Subject: creating bookcloth


> >>On Mon, 10 May 2004 Jet Wimp wrote:
> >>     To use a fabric for bookcloth merely because you like its
appearance
> >>is asking for trouble.
>
>
> Coming late to the party but just want to remind you-all that almost
> ANY fabric can be turned into bookcloth  with the traditional
> Japanese method of pasting it out with a thin flexible Japanese paper.
>
> My preferred method, however, since it is dead easy, with any fabric
> that can withstand heating (all cottons, most silks, many synthetics,
> many wools)  is to use "WonderUnder" or "Transweb" (no other brands
> are acceptable).  I cannot speak for their archival qualities except
> that they fall into the category of 'hot melt' adhesives.  Both these
> products can be obtained at your local fabric store or on the Web.
> They come as yardage, and are a filmy thin non-woven polymer(?)
> backed with heat- and stick-resistant paper.
>
> Cut out an oversized piece, this is ironed onto the back of your
> selected cloth with a HOT iron.  The paper is peeled off and any
> tissue paper of your choosing is ironed on next.  Trim to fit and you
> have a lovely flexible cloth that moisture and glue will not seep
> through.  When in a hurry and making a simple card or planning a
> coptic binding I have even skipped the tissue layer and ironed
> directly onto the bookboards, fold and iron the edges, fold again and
> iron down the turn-ins.  Sometimes ironing directly to the boards may
> cause a mild warping if the board is thin, but flattens out as it
> cools.  Or judicious ironing on alternate sides until the warp
> equalizes and then weight it over-night.  Now your only problem is
> how resistant your particular fabric is to ordinary wear-and-tear.
>
> These products also unite paper and cloth in a way that allows you to
> fold the cloth more as though it were paper - and the heavier backing
> paper you use, the more independent the structure you create can be.
> This expands the making of origami type creations, and simple folded
> boxes!
>
> Now you can use any fabric that appeals to you. I do not pretend to
> be a Fine Book-Binder, and would appreciate any input from you who
> know, whether this is archival.  I do have some items that were
> bonded more than ten years ago and show no signs of discoloring or
> separation.
>
> Happy ironing,  Henrietta
>
>
>
>
> --
> Henrietta in Blue Hill Maine
>
>              ***********************************************
>
>  MDE - Innovation 2004: An International Bookbinding Design Competition
>                        60,000 Euro in total prizes
>               Full information at <http://www.mde2004.org/>
>             E N T R Y  D E A D L I N E  -- J U N E 1, 2 0 0 4
>
>
>         See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>              ***********************************************
>

             ***********************************************

 MDE - Innovation 2004: An International Bookbinding Design Competition
                       60,000 Euro in total prizes
              Full information at <http://www.mde2004.org/>
            E N T R Y  D E A D L I N E  -- J U N E 1, 2 0 0 4


        See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************


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