[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [BKARTS] Davey quality (was Binders' board)



Hi,

While I can't vouch for the composition of binder board, I have been
working with library binding for 6 years now.  In handling the broken
down publishers bindings and the bindings produced by commercial binders
(ICI General and Heckman), I've observed that the buckram library
bindings are usually far superior.  Not to say that it's always perfect,
I've seen an oversewing job from the early 90's gone horribly wrong.
But these days, commercial binders leave oversewing as a last resort.

We're with Heckman now, they've been pretty good about retaining sewing
and not slopping on a lot of excess glue.  They also round and back our
periodicals nicely.  I realize that hand book binders are capable of
doing a better job by sewing on cords or tape and so forth, but compared
to publisher bindings, the library bindings are very good, and
relatively cheap.

As evidence of this I can point to the large, heavy art books.  Quite a
few cross my path in various damaged states; they are 99.9% publisher
bindings (can't remember the name, but the art publisher that uses a
fish motif is the worst offender).  I almost never get a an art book
with a damaged library binding from the past 30 years or so, not even
loose hinges.

I've been so spoiled by library bindings, I can't go into book stores
with friends because all I do is complain about the shoddy publisher
bindings!  Buckram is a homely fabric, but it's sturdy, I'd rather have
a book that lasts through multiple readings than a pretty book that
falls apart after one use.

Sincerely,
Diane Westerfield, Bindery/Preservation Coordinator
Loyola University Chicago, Cudahy Library Bindery

>>> CraftBook@xxxxxxx 05/26/04 09:01AM >>>
Diane,

The quality of library binding questionable. They do use Red Label
board.
They also do other things I would hesitate to recommend, such as chop
the back of
section sewn books and machine oversew them. As for the standards for
library
binding, they are obviously guide lines only. No one is going to rip a
newly
bound book apart to see if the binder used the proper board etc.

Red Label board is nearly pH neutral and often alkaline, because
calcium
hydroxide is used as a buffer.  Red Label board is made of 100% office
waste which
accounts for the pieces of rubber band and staples and paper clips that
are
sometimes found in it.  Davey Gold Label which is no longer made, was
made of
100% corrugated board.

While I would not vouch for its sturdiness, Red Label board is suitable
for
nearly all weights and thickness of books. It comes in many gauges from
.059 to
.247, which is quite a range.

Ed
http:www.bookrestoration.net/

             ***********************************************

 MDE - Innovation 2004: An International Bookbinding Design
Competition
                       60,000 Euro in total prizes
              Full information at <http://www.mde2004.org/>
            E N T R Y  D E A D L I N E  -- J U N E 1, 2 0 0 4


        See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************

 MDE - Innovation 2004: An International Bookbinding Design Competition
                       60,000 Euro in total prizes
              Full information at <http://www.mde2004.org/>
            E N T R Y  D E A D L I N E  -- J U N E 1, 2 0 0 4


        See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]