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Re: [BKARTS] Scharff-fix blade leveling idea



    This is what I do.  Is it too simple to work?  I put the leather under the
raised blade, then lower the blade till it just touches the leather.   I move
the leather back and forth.  I can see where the blade eats into the leather.
If, for example, it bites first into the far edge, I lower the near edge.  When
I find the blade encounters the leather equally on its near and far edges, the
blade is level; or at least, level enough for my work.
    It takes about 30 seconds.
    By the way, I think the Scharf-fix is a wonderful apparatus.  Paring the
leather, printing the title on the backed and pared leather and gluing this to
the leather spine piece allows for an added dimension of design in binding a
book.  It also makes it incredibly easier to center the lettering.  My
compliments to Frank Lehmann.
    By the way, I use ordinary two-edged blades in the Scharf-fix, available at
Riteaid or CVS. Very inexpensive.  I change the blade frequently, whenever
pulling the leather through begins to require added effort.  It's necessary to
brush the blade with a sash brush after each pull-through, and also frequently
brush or shake the leather.  This helps avoid the appearance of holes in the
leather.
    I pare a bunch of different leathers at one sitting, back them with
archival tissue, and put them in a notebook for future use.
Jet

Abi Sutherland wrote:

> Like many Scharff-fix users, getting the blade level has been pretty
> annoying.  And the fact that it's so exacting to do by eye means I am less
> keen to shave *gradually* becuause every re-adjustment is so tiresome.  I
> thought of a solution the other week, and have since tried it out.  It's
> worked well enough that I thought I'd share it with the list.
>
> Basically, I made a set of gauges, a lot like the feeler gauges I used to
> use in car work.
>
> I took pieces of 200 gsm cardstock (acid-free, but that's not important),
> about 5cm by 8cm and laminated them togther with wheat paste.  I created
> four, ranging from one layer thick to 4 layers thick (about .33 mm up to
> 1.33 mm).  I will probably use thinner paper to make intermediate ones in
> the near future.  I pressed them in the nipping press overnight to compress
> and harden them.
>
> The gauges are large enough for the blade of the Scharff-fix to rest
> entirely on them, and are of uniform thickness all the way across.  So I can
> slip the appropriate sized one in, loosen all the adjustments so the blade
> drops freely onto the card, then tighten the adjustments to hold it in that
> position.  I pull the card out, and am ready to pare.
>
> Quick, easy, cheap.  (and probably well known to everyone but me)
>
> Abi
> HYPERLINK "http://www.bookweb.sunpig.com/"http://www.bookweb.sunpig.com
> - the email of the species is deadlier than the mail -
>
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__________________________________________________
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J. J. Foncannon
Philadelphia, PA  19139

 The Belgian surrealist painter Renee Magritte entered a cheese store in
Brussels to purchase a wheel of Swiss cheese.  The owner pulled a wheel from
the front window, but Magritte said he preferred the one on the back counter.
 ìBut they are identical,î the owner protested.
 ìNo,î Magritte insisted.  ìThis oneís been stared at.î
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             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
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