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[BKARTS] bookcloth / Ikegami



Hi,

I'm sitting here with my copy of Kojiro Ikegami's Japanese Bookbinding.
In Chapter 3, Basic Binding Procedure, he talks about backing book
cover cloth.  He writes:

 "The special board used for drying the backed material is traditionally
  constructed from a latticed frame to which are pasted layers of
  Japanese paper, which are subsequently waterproofed with a coat
  of persimmon tannin or synthetic resin.  Because the surface
  remains porous, the backed paper or fabric can dry from both
  sides.  A smooth piece of plywood, or even a table top covered
  with plastic laminate, can be substituted."

Later, in the step by step, he writes:

 "24.  Brush thick paste along the outer edge of the backing paper
  around all four sides, and attach a paper tab to the center of
  one long side.  (This will facilitate removal from the drying
  board later.)

  25.  Reverse the backed fabric sandwich onto the drying board,
  brushing the four pasted edges down well.  A piece of plywood may
  be substituted for the special paper-covered drying board shown
  here."

I'm a little confused about any surface remaining porous after
receiving a coat of synthetic resin, but what I'm really writing
to ask is: what happens to your latticed frame or your piece of
plywood over time?  Are you supposed to try and remove the excess
paste?  Just keep working over it?  Sand it down?  Replace it when
the surface gets too uneven?

I'm embarking on a project and have a nice big sheet of MDF (heavy,
smooth particle board) I'm thinking of using.  But I'm planning
ahead and hoping that I'll be able to use it multiple times.

Thanks for any insights, Eric

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