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Re: [BKARTS] Film on Florence flood



I did finally get the film to run smoothly, for the most part. It was necessary to select "small." You are right, it is a terrific film.

Sally

On Nov 5, 2006, at 4:02 AM, bndrboi wrote:

It plays brilliantly for me and I've seen the original
film version as well. Both have the sound of the bells
a bit off at the beginning but that is it, well
actually there is a bit of breakup at the very start
of credits with the digitized. Also, there is not
constant narration in the film, instead long stretches
where the movie allows the images to speak for
themselves.
As a window on what was some mid-20th "best practice"
it is immensely valuable and of course watching Chris
Clarkson at work is pleasure enough. It would be
interesting to see an update.
Also it is important to remember that the film was
basically made to be part of fund raising efforts and
not as instruction.
As to the Corps stories, hmmm, the folks who brought
us Katrina! JK of course.
Another story going the rounds was that during WWII
the most valuable books and objects were moved to
ground floor and basement locations for fear of bomb
damage and just never returned to higher flood proof
levels. It was administrative inertia which doomed
Dante and spared Segal.
Then there is the story of the washing staff strike
over fungicide, and then the blue blotters debacle, oh
never mind!
Do watch.


--- Sally Jackson <serifm@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:


While this film is undoubtedly fascinating, I had an
enormous amount
of difficulty in viewing it, even though I have DSL
and a computer
about a year old. The sound is largely nonexistant
and the picture
extremely flawed.

As an aside, I lived in Italy for three years or so
in the early
70's. My husband, who was with the Corps of
Engineers, was told by
the engineers who worked for the Corps, some who had
been in
residence there during the time of the floods, that
the whole flood
was preventable. The rains that year had been heavy,
and the Italian
authorities had held back great quantities of water
until such time
as they were able to sell the electric power that
could be generated
upon release. When it became apparent that the
upstream dams would
break unless the water was released they had no
choice. The
goldsmiths on the Ponte Vecchio were given advance
warning so that
they could remove their stock of jewelry from their
shops on the
bridge. Apparently there wasn't sufficient time to
remove the books
from the libraries.

Sally Jackson


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Guild of Book Workers' 100th Anniversary Exhibition Now Online - Catalog Available
<http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byorg/gbw/gallery/100anniversary/>


             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

          See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
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***********************************************
Guild of Book Workers' 100th Anniversary Exhibition Now Online - Catalog Available
<http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byorg/gbw/gallery/100anniversary/>
For all your subscription questions, go to the
Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
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