[Table of Contents] [Search]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [BKARTS] inquiry



Melissa,

I am an old school entrepreneur myself, so you'll have to excuse my
appreciation for what I am about to pass on to you. (Psst, it's a secret!)

The most ancient secret to securing an apprenticeship with anyone is to make
an absolute nuisance of yourself. Call every day or two, send donuts and
cheesecake, and stop in to help...for free at the start of things. 

You see, the trick is to make yourself incredibly useful - so useful, in
fact, that they would miss you if you were to leave. Good help is hard to
find. Free help is next to impossible. When you bind the two together, you
have something too good to be true...the master of your choosing would be
wishing to have bought a lotto ticket, considering the luck of finding such
an amazing thing as a dedicated and hard working volunteer. 

The thing is, even I'm not willing to pay anything more than minimum wage
unless I know that the person is going to do a heck of a lot more than sort
type and sweep the floor (it's a miracle to get anyone at all to sweep the
floor around here without asking!) If you make yourself useful,  while
learning everything you can about the company, the person, and the methods,
while simultaneously becoming an excellent resource by showing competence,
efficiency, speed under pressure,  and a willingness to do the little things
- also paying attention to detail - then you'll not only find yourself with
a decent salary by the end of a couple of months, but you'll have created
your own position in that company by making it so that they can actually
afford to hire you in the first place!

Besides this, remember that a lot of places do not make a ton of money, so
be willing to start small, and then, as you learn the ropes, make yourself
so useful as to know the company inside and out. 

All of this, I did, and haven't looked back since. I've done this in several
industries, and in all cases, I have become indispensable to my employers.
I've also made a ton of friends this way. 

Robert L. Angus
Octavia & Co. Press



-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Melissa
Lamelza
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 11:43 AM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: inquiry


 
To whom it may concern:
 
My name is Melissa Lamelza and I am inquiring about a letterpress  
apprenticeship/fellowship that may be available. I hold a great appreciation
& respect 
for the arts, especially for the printed word and the process  through which

these words are given life. I have a background in graphic design,  and was 
first introduced to this wonderful world of letterpress in my senior  year
as an 
undergraduate. Since then, I have involved myself in these arts as  much as 
possible, but never as much as I had really wanted to, for one  reason or 
another. I am hoping someone out there could steer me in the right
direction as far 
as any opportunities that may be available to post graduates  such as myself

striving to work under the direction of a professional in this  field. Any 
information would be very helpful and appreciated.
 
Thank you.
 
Sincerely,
 
Melissa Lamelza
_lamelza@xxxxxxxx (mailto:lamelza@xxxxxxx) 




************************************** See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.

             ***********************************************
               The Bonefolder, Vol. 3, No. 2, Spring 2007
          Now Online @ <http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder>
                                    
     Visit "The Book of Origins: A survey of American Fine Binding"
                Online exhibit and catalog order form at
       <http://library.syr.edu/digital/exhibits/b/bookoforigins/>
                                    
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
          See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
               The Bonefolder, Vol. 3, No. 2, Spring 2007
          Now Online @ <http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder>
                                    
     Visit "The Book of Origins: A survey of American Fine Binding"
                Online exhibit and catalog order form at
       <http://library.syr.edu/digital/exhibits/b/bookoforigins/>
                                    
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
          See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
             ***********************************************


[Subject index] [Index for current month] [Table of Contents] [Search]