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Re: [BKARTS] Brass Type in US?



Brian,

I'm afraid your approximation of the amount of brass mixed into foundry type is quite a bit excessive as there is none involved in the mix, see:

http://www.daleguild.com/Alloy_Table.html

It is still a better alternative to Mono/Ludlow/Thompson cast sorts because of the amount of Antimony and Tin added. To reply to another earlier post regarding depth of drive you might consider checking out Michael Bixler's Monotype foundry as he uses English molds which have a substantially greater depth yet still allowing for more support on delicate kerns:

http://www.mwbixler.com/

I'm fortunate enough to have acquired several dozen fonts of brass type when purchasing equipment from a monastery years ago though I have used foundry type when the desired "look" was needed.

Chad
_____________________________

Chad Pastotnik
Deep Wood Press   231.587.0506
http://www.deepwoodpress.com


On Jun 22, 2007, at 12:35 PM, Brian Maloney wrote:


Bill, standard metal type is composed of lead, tin & antimony and is generally too soft for repeated use in tooling.
Foundry type adds about 10 - 20 % brass to the mix depending on the foundry and the size of the font.
Larger pt. sizes need more brass for stability.
It used to be common that all type over 36pt had at least some brass in it so the type could withstand the pressure of the printing. Now it's more often 42 & 48 pt. where it starts with the brass.
M&H in San Francisco used to offer some foundry type at 18 pt and up.
The problem with filling in comes with certain typefaces or fonts where the counters (the holes) tend to be smaller or more irregular in shape so that the counter is not sunk as deeply and hence is less defined.
This is because for letterpress the type is meant to kiss the page with only a little bite, whereas with tooling it needs to bite deeper than letterpress. Also the more open the type, the better defined the shoulders allowing more bite.
This is all font specific.
I have a good selection of metal fonts that I have used for tooling, but I generally stick to the more open fonts as they are clearer, more legible and ultimately more forgiving with the gold.
I hope this helps.
Brian Maloney
Bookbinder/Conservator
Toronto, Canada



Peter,
While I agree that cast Lead Type is an economic alternative for hot stamping, there may be a short-coming. When I was using lead type, I found that some letters were not cast deep enough for stamping, especially when stamping leather. Some of those areas would easily fill-in with the stamping foil, creating a time- consuming clean-up problem. Some type may not have this problem.
I might also add that I heard that true Foundry Type is a little harder and a little more costly than the Mono-Type offered by some type suppliers. The harder, alloyed type should be able to withstand the heat and pressure better. I am sure there is someone on this List who has more information on this point?
Bill Minter



On Jun 20, 2007, at 1:37 PM, Peter Verheyen wrote:


If you're going to be using the type in a pallet (for hand use), or in a low volume stamping press environment, I would like to suggest you look into cast type as well. When I bought my Model 86 Kwikprint I purchased 2 fonts in 7 sizes each for about what I would have paid for perhaps 2~3 sizes of a single font in brass. I think I spent about $900 in 1999. Even in the small sizes with normal gentle use, I have lost very few letters to wear. Additionally the type was sold by weight meaning that I got lots of letters in the smaller sizes (I started with 8pt) and still had more than enough for normal titling at 32pt (my largest). The type can be used equally well in hand pallet or the Kwikprint (or any other stamping press). Key, of course, is know how to use the equipment, how much pressure is needed, temperature settings, ...


******************************


William Minter Bookbinding & Conservation, Inc. 4364 Woodbury Pike Woodbury, PA 16695 814-793-4020 Fax: 814-793-4045 Email: wminter@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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***********************************************
The Bonefolder, Vol. 3, No. 2, Spring 2007
Now Online @ <http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder>
Visit "The Book of Origins: A survey of American Fine Binding"
Online exhibit and catalog order form at
<http://library.syr.edu/digital/exhibits/b/bookoforigins/>
For all your subscription questions, go to the
Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
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***********************************************
The Bonefolder, Vol. 3, No. 2, Spring 2007
Now Online @ <http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder>
Visit "The Book of Origins: A survey of American Fine Binding"
Online exhibit and catalog order form at
<http://library.syr.edu/digital/exhibits/b/bookoforigins/>
For all your subscription questions, go to the
Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
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